• An Interview with Allaine Stricklen

    HEART WIDE OPEN

    Where are you from?

    ORIGINALLY FROM LONDON ENGLAND LIVING IN MIAMI CURRENTLY.

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    YOGA CAME INTO MY LIFE WHEN I WAS 7 YEARS YOUNG. I LEARNED FIRSTLY HOW TO MEDITATE AND RELAX THEN THE ASANA PRANAYAMA PRACTICE CAME NEXT. MY VERY FIRST MEDITATION EXPERIENCE I FLOATED AND TRAVELED IN SPACE (ASTRAL REALM).

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    YOGA FOR ME IS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING AS I PRACTICE EVERY DAY I HAVE LEARNED TO LISTEN TO WHAT MY BODY MIND AND SPIRIT GUIDE ME TO EXPERIENCE.

    What is yoga to you?

    YOGA FOR ME HAS BEEN SUCH AN INCREDIBLE MAGICAL HEALING MYSTICAL AND HUMBLING PRACTICE. YOGA HAS TAUGHT ME FLEXIBILITY OPENNESS & PATIENCE WHICH I TAKE OFF MY YOGA MAT INTO MY LIFE. SO MUCH GRATITUDE, JOY, LOVE HAVE AND CONTINUE TO MANIFEST IN MY LIFE. THANKS TO THE YOGA PATH.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    I ACTUALLY CRIED AND CRIED DURING MY VERY FIRST YOGA CLASS SAVASANA, AND CONTINUED TO SHED LAYERS AND LAYERS OF EMOTION FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, AS YOGA HELPED ME TO LET GO OF HELD STUCK EMOTION.

    I LOVE TO CREATE A CALM WARM & WELCOMING SPACE FOR EVERYONE WHO JOINS ME TO PRACTICE WITH NO JUDGEMENT JUST ENCOURAGEMENT AND LOVE.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved, and transformed?

    I CERTAINLY WAS A VERY ACTIVE CHILD VERY INQUISITIVE INDEED. YOGA BREATHWORK & MEDITATION HAVE CERTAINLY TRANSFORMED ME TO MOVE INTO STILLNESS WITHOUT JUDGEMENT AND LOVE MYSELF MORE AND MORE EVERY DAY.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching, and within the yoga community?

    BEING PATIENT ON EVERY LEVEL LEARNING TO PLANT A SEED AND WATER IT WATCH IT GROW AND HAVING FAITH THAT STUDENTS WILL SHOW UP READY TO GROW EVOLVE AND HEAL.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    THE MOST INSPIRATIONAL MOMENT AS A STUDENT MEETING BKS IYENGAR IN PUNE INDIA. WHAT AN AMAZING MOMENT. I AM TRULY GRATEFUL.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga teacher?

    THERE ARE SO MANY INSPIRATIONAL MOMENTS I HAVE EXPERIENCED ESPECIALLY WHEN I SEE STUDENTS HEALING THEMSELVES, PURE BLISS FOR MY HEART AND SOUL.

    Why do you practice?

    I FEEL SO MUCH MORE POWERFUL AND VIBRANT WHEN I PRACTICE YOGA.

    Why do you teach?

    I LOVE TO SHARE WISDOM KNOWLEDGE TO HELP SUPPORT NURTURE AND HEAL EVERYONE I MEET WITH A SMILE LOVE AND JOY…. IT FEEDS MY SOUL AND NOURISHES MY HEART.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    LIGHT ON YOGA BKS IYENGAR
    BREAKING THE HABIT OF BEING YOURSELF DR JOE DISPENZA

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    GENTLE THERAPEUTICS YOGA IS A GENTLE HEALING APPROACH TO YOGA USING PROPS SUCH AS CHAIRS, BLOCKS BLANKETS AND BOLSTERS TO FACILITATE THE POSTURES AND SUPPORT THE BODY… I LOVE PROPS AND INVITE MY STUDENTS TO EMBRACE THEM…

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    FIND A TEACHER YOU LOVE…. TRY DIFFERENT STYLES OF YOGA …

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I AM CURRENTLY WORKING ON LEARNING ABOUT THE BRAIN AND STUDYING POLY VAGAL THERAPY AND HAVE BECOME A HEALTH COACH AS WELL.

    What’s your favorite book?

    LIGHT ON YOGA BKS IYENGAR

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    I LOVE SOUPS VEGGIE CURRY, SO ASIAN FOOD INDIAN FOOD WITH SPICES I LOVE ALSO.

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    ANYTHING GREEN VEGGIES ESPECIALLY FRESH JUICES SALADS

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    ANYTHING THAT IS FOOD-RELATED I LOVE TO COOK AND EAT OF COURSE…

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    BKS IYENGAR GURY MAYI SIDDHA YOGA MEDITATION DR JOE DISPENZA

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    I LOVE ANYTHING ON TED TALKS AND ALSO I LOVE HOMEBOUND AND NO TOILET PAPER PODCAST.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    WATER, FOOD, YOGA MAT

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    A STOCK BROKER

    What’s your favorite movie?

    DEATH IN VENICE DIRK BOGART

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    DO NOT HAVE A TV.

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?

    EARTH WIND AND FIRE

    Favorite song to dance to?

    HIGHER LOVE BY WHITNEY HOUSTON

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    TODAY I WELCOME INFINITE POSSIBILITIES WITH OPEN ARMS, I ACCEPT SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSE, I KNOW THAT ABUNDANCE OF HEALTH WEALTH AND LOVE ARE AVAILABLE TO ME NOW.

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    HOW DO YOU BECOME A GENIUS????

    By Allaine Stricklen

    By Allaine Stricklen is an accredited Master Yoga Instructor with the Yoga Alliance and IAYT -International Association of Yoga Therapists. Allaine teaches and offers meditation sessions, workshops, and Teacher Training programs all over the world including Miami. Her unique style of teaching derives from her extensive studies in many different styles of Yoga, including Iyengar Yoga. Allaine is the creator of Gentle Therapeutics Yoga, a method utilizing props to restore the body’s balance and vitality. She currently teaches at many studios in the Miami area About Gentle Therapeutics Yoga is the Yoga of non-doing and the core practice underlying the essence of all Yoga. Even those with an active dynamic practice will benefit greatly from the inner peace and deep release of this Restorative class. Gentle Therapeutics Yoga is the practice of entering into Yoga postures using an assortment of props: blankets, bolsters, blocks, straps, walls, chairs, eye pillows etc. Supported and stabilized by various props, one experiences the Yoga postures as profoundly relaxing and deeply rejuvenating, invoking a natural state of healing rest, renewal, and equanimity. Supported and passive yoga postures allow the body to naturally release, letting go of held tension and stress. The results are a balanced state of being from the inside out. Gentle Therapeutics Yoga is a life-enhancing practice and is appropriate for anyone at any age or stage of life and in any physical condition.

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  • An Interview with Anamargret Sanchez

    Funny, Irreverent, Loyal

    Where are you from?

    I’m a Jamaican living in Miami.

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    The profound practices of Yoga helped me get through the grief of losing my elders one year apart. The journey has been deep, magical, and life-changing. Yoga has connected me to so many different people, supported me in joy and sorrow, and brought me to a revolution of consciousness. I’d say it’s been an amazing journey so far with more surprises to come.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    Yoga has taught me to go inward. To uncover the voice of intuition and trust it. To have courage to look at my shadows. To understand that compassion and radical self-love are necessary to be able to offer the same to others. It creates a space for authentic joy.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is my north star. It helps redirect me when I fall off the mindfulness wagon. There is no longer a difference between my Yoga on the mat and off the mat.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    I felt so embodied after my first yoga class. Like I had finally arrived home in my body and the space around me. I had never felt so whole before. That feeling is what I try to provide for students. Everyone is welcome. Everyone is seen. Everyone is safe. You are home.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    When I experienced the profound healing qualities of Yoga I felt the need to share that with others. It’s important as a teacher to SEE the student in front of you and not the idea of what a pose should look like. It’s the most important to have your own practice so you have something rich and authentic to transmit. You have to do the work before you can teach the work. Remember you are a student before you are a teacher- always.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    When my intuition very strongly led me to my Himalayan Tantric lineage. I had never heard that inner voice speak so loudly or clearly.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga teacher?

    I’ve had many. But the most recent one was when a student told me that her yoga practice brought her back to her spirituality. That made my heart soar.

    Why do you practice?

    To stay awake to Life.

    Why do you teach?

    Because I love to share the rich beauty of Yoga. And I feel blessed every time I teach that I can be a conduit for the teachings. I can get out of the way knowing that any transformation that takes place is the grace that happens between the student and their practice.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    Holding the space between Namaste and activism.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    Loving the simple, yet thought-provoking, message of the Yamas & Niyamas by Deborah Adele.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Student first. Teacher second. Consistent practice is key. Fill your toolbox. Be the light.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    Bringing the linear and the spiritual together.

    What’s your favorite book?

    Siddhartha

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    Vegetarian Picadillo & Parmesan crisps

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    Dance, swim, draw, write poetry, go boating, host dinner parties, read, laugh with friends, go on road trips, be out in nature with Fonzie.

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    My Grandmothers

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    Right now I’m listening to Lama Rod.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    Books, my dog Fonzie, my favorite knife

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    A teacher- lol

    What’s your favorite movie?

    The Man That Fell to Earth

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Sense8

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?

    David Bowie

    Favorite song to dance to?

    Salsa music in general

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    “Look for the rainbow after the rain.” my personal quote

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    Who is the I?

    By Anamargret Sanchez

    Among Miami’s most experienced and sought-after yoga teachers, Anamargret Sanchez is a global citizen of Jamaican, Cuban, and German heritage. She is a dedicated teacher and student of the yoga tradition, and has been blessed to study with many respected teachers, including Rod Stryker, creator of Para Yoga, Manorama, founder of Sanskrit Studies, T.K.V. Desikachar, Leslie Kaminoff, Marlysa Sullivan, and Judith Lasater. She is Cofounder of the Enhanced Healing Yoga Studio, located in Miami’s Upper East Side, and Cohosts YOGAMI, a podcast originating in Miami and focusing on “yoga and stuff.” As part of her commitment to giving and service through yoga, Anamargret also founded the Legion Park Community Yoga class, East Miami’s most successful and long-running yoga outreach effort. Anamargret’s classes are challenging, fun, compassionate, and create space for students to shine in their own light.

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  • An Interview with Angelica Wilson

    Unicorn, Ambivert, Different

    Where are you from?

    I’m a born and raised New Yorker that’s still in NYC.

    What is yoga to you?

    Practice for how to handle life’s wild situations.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Honestly, there are too many to count. But all of them have a common theme of making me feel seen in the yoga space. So many times (pre-covid) I’d walk into a class and automatically be asked if I’ve ever done yoga before or if I know that I signed up for a non-beginner class. While other students who were actually new weren’t asked the same questions. Anytime a teacher let me practice or motivated me to go farther gave me an inspiring moment to remember.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga teacher?

    I don’t know if this is inspirational but one time when I was teaching at a donation-based studio a student came in who didn’t look as “neat” as the other students and the manager on duty looked a bit nervous about them being in the room. They came in, paid for the mat rental, and set up in the back. The manager looked kind of confused as to whether she should ask the student to leave. I wasn’t bothered nor were the other students. She asked if I was okay with having them in class and I said “yes”. It felt great to sort of be a deciding voice at that moment to not turn away someone for wanting to practice. Needless to say, the class went well and everyone was fine. But it was kind of funny to me that after the class the manager called me brave for letting them practice. I wasn’t brave I was just doing my job.

    Why do you practice?

    To keep myself sane-ish.

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    My offering to the community is to provide as many options as possible so people can realize yoga is for them. Whether it be physical variations or offering options during a meditation no matter what I’m guiding I want to always offer options.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Yoga is not easy but it gets easier. Unless you stop for a while then it gets hard for a little bit but then it gets easier again. Also, there’s more than one way to do most poses. (Speaking from a vinyasa point of view.)

    What’s your favorite book?

    the life changing magic of not giving a fuck by Sarah Knight

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    Grilled Pork Belly

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    Seaweed Soup

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    Learn K-pop Dances

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    K-pop Daebak with Eric Nam

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    Phone, Phone Cable, Portable Charger

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    Singer, Fashion Designer, Forensic Scientist

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Great British Baking Show

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?

    SHINee

    Favorite song to dance to?

    Anything that isn’t country haha

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    “Stop trying to impress everybody. You don’t even like everybody.” – Anonymous

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    Why?

    By Angelica Wilson

    Angelica Wilson has been guiding bodies through space for over a decade. At 15 years old she became a dance instructor for her local studio. At age 18 she was convinced by a friend to take a yoga class and fell in love with savasana. The feeling of rest after so much movement was euphoric. Over the years she’s found movement to be her escape, second home, and source of comfort. As she began teaching yoga, she found that there weren’t many teachers that looked like her but there were plenty of students that did. That realization led her to become a full time yoga instructor. Through teaching, Angelica is the representation that she wishes to see on and off the mat, to show that everyBODY can do yoga.

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  • An Interview with Lauren Chaitoff

    Energetic, Disarming, and Loyal

    Where are you from?

    I’m from Long Island and after living in Chicago, Los Angeles, and NYC, I am back in Long Island where it all started!

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    I started practicing yoga in college. Like many other people, I started it with only the physical benefits in mind. About two years into practicing I began to notice the effects the practice would have on my mind. When I was deep into practice my mind had a one-pointed focus and I felt calm. I’ve always practiced Asana, however, for the past 5 years, my meditation practice has been just as paramount to me as the physical.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    My practice is my anchor. It is a daily ritual that grounds and centers me.

    What is yoga to you?

    To me, Yoga is a way of life. When I teach kids I focus on the body-heart-mind components of Yoga. I want them to understand it is so much more than just the Asana – that it is a way of living.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    I took my first yoga class in college after having my heart broken. I went to class not knowing what to expect. I remember feeling the class was a place of non-judgment and there was no competition. The teacher kept reminding us that it was ok if we couldn’t do certain poses – it was very different from any other activity I had experienced in a gym setting.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved, and transformed?

    I still have anxiety and struggle with reacting too quickly, however, Yoga has made me more self-aware and self-reflective. (Svadhyaya) I notice how my practice on the mat mirrors what’s going on in my life off the mat. Without my practice, I would feel like I was free-falling. My practice definitely roots me!

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    I began teaching yoga in 2007. I started out as a pilates instructor and as my own personal Yoga practice continued to deepen I knew I wanted to share the practice with my clients. I think one of the most important qualities of a yoga instructor is to create an environment where everyone feels welcome, accepted, and included.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    While living in NYC getting the opportunity to practice on a weekly basis with Sri Dharma Mittra was truly inspiring.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga teacher?

    When kids tell me how they used their yoga practice off of their mat (eg: taking deep breathes when they are feeling angry or sad, or mastering a pose in their own time) always reassures me that I am on the right path.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    The yoga/wellness community needs to do better in terms of inclusivity and diversity. I’m constantly listening and learning on ways I can take action and do my part to make that change.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    Not necessarily yoga, however, I love A Path with Heart by Jack Kornfield, Polishing the Mirror by Ram Dass, The Power on Intention by Wayne Dyer, and most recently purchased, Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art by James Nestor

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    I definitely feel my path is to work with children and share the practice with them. I also feel incredibly inspired when I lead our Kids Yoga Teachers Trainings. I love sharing my knowledge and experience of teaching yoga to kids, and I am always left feeling inspired by the trainees and knowing all the good people that are out there in the world looking to make a difference

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Practice with a variety of teachers, try different styles, and always continue learning and listening.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    Yogi Beans has original kids’ music that we will be releasing soon! (You can hear some of the tracks in our Om Stars + Yogi Beans classes) I am also working on compiling an On Demand library of Yogi Beans classes and short exercises that can be sprinkled into kids’ everyday life as well as some other surprise collaborations that are in the works!

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    Stuffed Artichoke

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    Vegetarian loaded nachos

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    Anything in Nature makes me most happy!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    Both my grandmothers are huge inspirations to me.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    My family, music, and snacks!

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    Vet/Actress (My plan was to act during the week and be a Vet on the weekends!)

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    The Office

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    Be Here Now

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    There are so many….

    By Lauren Chaitoff

    Lauren Chaitoff founded Yogi Beans in 2007. Lauren found herself teaching yoga to hundreds of kids, attending numerous trainings, workshops and lectures and designing the Yogi Beans curriculum “sprouting” from her innate ability to connect with children and her knowledge of yoga. Yogi Beans has since become one of the top rated children’s programs in New York City. As Founder & CEO, Lauren oversees and trains the stellar Yogi Beans Instructor team, leads regular Yogi Beans’ public teacher trainings, and creates and teaches weekly classes to beans of all ages at a range of venues. Lauren holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theater from Northwestern University and is a registered E-RYT Yoga Instructor through the Yoga Alliance. Lauren continuously evolves Yogi Beans’ programming from her extensive experiences in the classroom, on her mat, and through her love of her own beans, Vivienne Bell and Juliette Rose.

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  • Interview with Shawn J. Moore

    observant, ambitious, a vibe lol

    Where are you from?

    I’m from Baltimore, MD, but I am currently living in Atlanta, GA.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is spaciousness for self-inquiry.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    I honestly did not feel welcomed in my first yoga class. I felt “othered”. It makes me so much more
    intentional about how I facilitate and how I hold space for people who take my classes.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved, and transformed?

    I don’t think I was anyone different. For me yoga has allowed me to shine brighter in who I am, dissolving some societal and cultural blockages.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to
    build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    I decided to lean into teaching yoga (focusing more on stillness practices like meditation, Yoga Nidra, sound healing) as a means for personal exploration for others. For me, I like to create those opportunities for folks to listen deeply to themselves and inquire deeply about beliefs, power, and authenticity.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching
    and within the yoga community?

    My biggest struggle is not letting the superficial side of the practice that is sometimes promoted dampen my own practice and perspective on the work. I think my biggest milestone has just been the ability to connect with larger platforms, to share practices from a unique perspective. For me, representation is important.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    As a student – just sticking with the practice past some of the microagressions I experienced.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga teacher?

    Inspiring my students at Morehouse College (I teach full-time) to get involved in meditation and yoga.

    Why do you practice?

    I practice being in alignment with Self. For me, practice is practical, spiritual, and developmental.

    Why do you teach?

    Representation matters. I teach so people that look like me know that these practices are for them and
    beneficial to them.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    Authentic safe spaces. I think oftentimes, people promote studios and offerings as inclusive and equitable. As someone that is explorative to studios and practices, I know that it isn’t always to case. It is harmful, traumatizing, and damaging to BIPOC and LGBTQ+ plus communities. I know this as a Black, gay man.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    My Grandmother’s Hands by Resmaa Menakem
    Comfortable with Uncertainty: 108 Teachings on Cultivating Fearlessness and Compassion by Pema Chödrön

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the
    community- local and global?

    Residing at the intersection of leadership and mindfulness, my work, whether yoga or otherwise, creates sacred spaces for self-inquiry and personal discovery.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Approach the practice from a place of exploration.

    What’s your Favorite Book?

    Siddartha by Herman Hesse

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    Pizza…. I am a happy camper with PIZZZZZZA! lol

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    ummm…. still pizza… I am not above making it at home lol

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    I am a gamer, through and through!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    Kid Cudi

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    The Gary Vee Experience

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    My dog, iPad, and a singing bowl lol

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    a paleontologist

    What’s your favorite movie?

    Jurassic Park (see: what I wanted be when I grew up) lol

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    The Office

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?

    Kid Cudi and Daft Punk

    Favorite song to dance to?

    Oasis – Wonderwall

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    “Such as I am, I am a precious gift.” – Zora Neale Hurston

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    What is legacy?

    By Shawn J. Moore

    Mindfulness has been an integral part of Shawn J. Moore’s life. In 2019, he decided to take his refuge vow (a formal commitment to the Buddhist Path) in the Shambhala lineage. He is a Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT-200), sound practitioner, meditation teacher, Yoga Nidra Teacher, reiki practitioner, and Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach, with trainings in Mindful Communication and Brand Identity.

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  • Interview with Henry Winslow

    I practice to understand myself, and to realize the best possible version of myself in this lifetime.

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I was raised in Richmond, VA, but I discovered yoga in New York City. I currently live in Los Angeles, CA.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    On a day-to-day level, I’d say the greatest practical gift I’ve received from yoga is the perspective to decide what will activate me and what I will let slide. In a perfect world, we should be choosy about these things, but most people don’t have the wherewithal to direct their energy.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is a never-ending path to deeper clarity and aligned living. The physical practices temper your nervous system, so that you can think, speak, and act from intention rather than reaction. And the contemplative practices ensure that those intentions are in fact aligned to your personal values.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    I left my first yoga class energized and excited about new possibilities. I remember being motivated by the asanas that were beyond my reach, so now as I teacher, I always try to keep students invigorated with a challenge.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    I found yoga at a critical pivot point in my life. I was finishing college and entering adulthood, and for the first time in my life, there wasn’t an obvious next step or paved path ahead of me. Establishing a yoga practice gave me a structure to fall back on as I navigated unsettling changes in my career, friendships, living arrangements, etc. At first, yoga was a tool I used to stay grounded through a period of shifting sense of self, and later yoga eventually became part of my identity.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    I resisted teaching for a long time because I had been telling myself a story that my practice, or the sanctity of it, would suffer if I mixed yoga with work. As it turned out, teaching actually deepened my practice by pushing me to connect more intimately with other people, develop my empathic senses, and in turn, recognize intricacies of my personality that I had taken for granted or not consciously considered. I think all yoga teachers share a few responsibilities. First and foremost, we have to keep up our own practice. Also, we have to be vigilant about staying humble and cultivating a beginner’s mind. Finally, I believe it’s important to honor the traditional roots of yoga. That doesn’t mean you can’t add your own unique spin. It’s possible (and beneficial, in my opinion) to modernize and personalize your practice and teaching without appropriating culture.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?

    In 2018, I won the World Yoga Asana Championships in Beijing, China. Plenty of people scoff at the idea of competitive yoga, and I think that’s totally fair. But I still point to my experience competing as both a major struggle and a major milestone because of the lessons I learned on stage. I competed for several years at the regional and even national level, and every time I would be well prepared and polished, only to stumble once it was my turn under the spotlight. The year that I progressed all the way to internationals and won first place was the year that I finally allowed myself to relax. I stopped trying to be the absolute best, and simply made my goal to do what was average for me. I’d always heard and understood intellectually that putting undue pressure on oneself wasn’t helpful, but the yoga championships ingrained this knowing in my physical body.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga teacher?

    This year, when studios shut down worldwide in response to COVID-19, I was surprised, impressed, and inspired by the yoga community’s adaptability. Studios, teachers, and students rallied, stumbled their way through standing up online classes, and continued to support each other when everyone needed it most.

    Why do you practice?
    I practice to understand myself, and to realize the best possible version of myself in this lifetime.

    Why do you teach?

    To help others do the same.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    Wow, this is a tough question… because there are SO many defining issues facing the global yoga community today. The events of 2020 have escalated a whole host of problems in our society that have been percolating just underneath the surface — abuse of power, systemic racism, exploitation of nature, and individualism (not inherently a bad thing) to the point of total self-absorption and lack of compassion for others, to name a few.

    If I have to pick one issue to plant my flag in, I’ll choose the alarming tendency of folks in the yoga or ‘spiritual’ communities to disengage from reality. There are two parts to this issue. First, as yogis, we want to rise above the suffering in the world — that’s why many of us sought out yoga in the first place. But we can’t do it by disengaging from the dirty work in front of us. It’s not ‘divisive’ to confront real-world problems, or engage in political discourse and social justice. Spiritually bypassing these challenges is not a viable option.

    The second part is the growing overlap between spiritual seekers and conspiracy theorists. I can sympathize with people whose trust in authority has been tested, but that skepticism is misguided when we reject science and academic consensus outright. There’s a lot to unpack with this topic, and I can’t give it full and proper attention in this post. I highly recommend the Conspirituality podcast for those interested in learning more about this social phenomenon.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I loved Eddie Stern’s book, One Simple Thing. He does a wonderful job demystifying the core teachings of the Yoga Sutras in plain language, and the second half weaves in modern neuroscience to support the benefits of the practice.

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    My understanding of my role within the community is always evolving and taking new shape. For a time, I think my place of service was in teaching classes, and to an extent, that’s still what I want to do. But if look ahead into the future, I believe my biggest impact is yet to come, through entrepreneurship, conscious capitalism, and leading a new generation of business leaders by example to shape the world in a positive way.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Never compare yourself to others — only to yourself, yesterday.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I’m thrilled that Henry Yoga, the app-based program I co-created, is merging onto Omstars. I honestly can’t think of a better home for the program or our users, and I’m honored and grateful to build upon my existing partnership with Omstars. With Henry Yoga off my plate from a business standpoint, I’m freed up to ideate, create, and launch new projects. And yes, I do have something new in the works already, but it’s not quite ready to share!

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    Vegan pizza!

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    Chana masala

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    My cat, Phil. He never worries about the future nor ruminates about the past. He is always present and content. Phil is an enlightened master.

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    I recommended Conspirituality above because it covers a really important topic for our community, but my favorite show is probably the Rich Roll Podcast. Rich is a vegan activist, alcoholic in recovery, ultra-marathoner, and of course a stellar interviewer. He invites on the most inspiring guests and hosts rich and insightful conversations across topics that matter.

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    A doctor

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Lately the best series I’ve seen, which I binged about 15 years after its release, was Avatar: The Last Airbender. It’s light, playful, and packed with profound spiritual wisdom.

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    I have everything I need and more.

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    How can I help?

    By Henry Winslow

    Henry Winslow is a dedicated yoga practitioner of 9 years, whose teaching is rooted in the Ghosh, Ashtanga, and Dharma Yoga traditions. In 2018, Henry took first place in the International Yoga Sport Federation’s world championships. Although strength and flexibility initially attracted him to the mat and remain a focal point of his teaching, his appreciation for the practice has since expanded beyond the physical. To Henry, yoga is above all else a tool for cultivating clarity. Through workshops, private and group classes, and his podcast Dharma Talk, Henry empowers students worldwide to connect to their innermost selves, where our natural resilience, unlimited power, and universal compassion reside.

    Take classes taught by Henry Winslow on Omstars.

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  • Interview with Emily Cox

    Firey, Silly, Authentic

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from Kansas City Missouri and currently live and work here. However, I would love to move to the beach in the next few years!

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    I was always a very athletic child. I played soccer, basketball, volleyball, the like. I had a full-ride scholarship to college for soccer and decided that I wanted to deviate from the path that was laid out for me, yet felt this yearning for the discipline and structure that I always had from sports. A friend asked me to join her for a hatha yoga class at a local studio. I bounced from studio to studio taking different styles and methods of Yoga until I walked into an Ashtanga class 10 years ago. I was hooked! The discipline, the structure, the rigidity, the spiritually inclined philosophical teachings were everything that I needed at the ripe age of 19. I continue to take classes at that same studio to date and owe so much of my physical, spiritual, and mental growth to this practice.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    Yoga has dramatically shifted my life and my practice has evolved significantly over the years. It creates stability and comfort for me while also providing a strict and disciplined format that I can rely on. The asana practice is like a safe laboratory to explore the often unsafe challenges of the world around us. For this reason, I find everything that I need through the practice.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga to me is a way of exploring the inner self. I feel that our biggest disease in the west is our disconnect with ourselves. Thus, I find that the more I practice, the closer I get to my purest form.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    After my first Yoga class, I remember feeling things I had never felt before. Places in the body, places in the mind and the space between felt as if a veil had been lifted. For this reason, I tell my students to let go of everything they think they know about the body, the mind, the breath, and the practice as every time we step onto our mat we come with a brand new body, set of intentions, stressors, triggers and truamas. So, it is important to view every class regardless of how seasoned you are as you viewed your first: Knowing nothing and ready to learn about not only the practice, but the self.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved, and transformed?

    I was lucky to have found Yoga at a young age, so my life before consisted primarily of going to school, playing soccer, and contemplating life. However, Yoga has deeply changed me since discovering it. My whole life pivoted in the direction of Yoga. I don’t do Yoga, I am Yoga!

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    In the beginning, my intention was actually not to teach. I received my certification in hopes to deepen my own practice. When I arrived home, the studio where I practiced had an opening for an Intro to Ashtanga class on Sunday mornings. I agreed to mentor under the teacher who had been teaching the class for several years prior and ultimately took it over after she left and opened her own studio. I feel it is vital to be authentic & provide a modern take on ancient teachings to the best of your ability.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching, and within the yoga community?

    In my practice & teaching my biggest milestone was myself. I am a type-A person, I guess a lot of us Ashtangis are, huh? Thus, the ego and I have a hot and cold relationship. Within the Yoga community, I have found that it is important to remember that everyone is human.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Practicing with Kino is definitely up there! Although, traveling to India to live and breathe Yoga for 5 weeks wasn’t bad either!

    Why do you practice?

    I practice in order to develop a deeper relationship with myself and the world around me, to transcend the limits of the mind, and to tap into something limitless.

    Why do you teach?

    I teach to share the method of Yoga. This practice is so powerful and so healing for the mind, body, and soul…I feel it’s my duty to be a vessel to pass on the knowledge.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    I feel that saturation is a big issue. Yoga is much like the game of telephone. One person’s Guru told them something which was interpreted by someone else as such and so on and so forth and the next thing you know there is Rage Yoga and Goat Yoga and Beer Yoga and it dilutes the integrity of the method itself.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I highly recommend educational books like:

    • Light on Yoga
    • The Living Gita
    • The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
    • How Yoga Works
    • The Journey Home

    Also anything Kino writes is gold!

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    I feel that my offering is to share a life of health and happiness with everyone around me. To preach the power of personalized nutrition and to spread the message of Yoga!

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Just keep coming! The first few classes are always the most vulnerable and then you’ll be hooked!

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I am currently holding a Mentorship Mastermind Program for new and aspiring Yoga instructors. I will be holding 2 per year! Other than that, I am working on some upcoming events, collaborations, teaching experiences, etc. so just stay in the loop on my Instagram, website or newsletter!

    What’s your Favorite Book?

    All time favorite book is WomanCode. Totally changed my life.

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    I am a sucker for ravioli!

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    My Fiance and I make a mean gf vegan lasagna, mac n cheese & Shakshuka. We also love homemade cesar salads with grilled salmon! I am always experimenting for work and recently we have done a lot of soups… vegan potato soup… to die for! Oh and all of the smoothies, juices, protein balls and anything breakfast all of the time!

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    I have a huge garden with chickens that I tend to! I love to be outside in the sun by the water. I like to read, cook, eat, and i’ll admit it…I indulge in reality TV from time to time!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    Kino! She has really built an empire, yet is incredibly humble despite being one of the most well-spoken and well-read FEMALE individuals in her field. She is an expert and has devoted her life to the practice and I commend her!

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    I love Stuff You Should Know! They are always discussing new and interesting topics, telling crazy stories or recounting historical events. Definitely worth listening to!

    Also MindBodyGreen.

    I also love podcasts on women in business, relationship advice, nutrition and health, science, mindfulness and self-growth

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    Swiss army knife/machete, matches/mirror, sleeping bag (trying to be realistic)

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    I wanted to be a lot of things that kids say they want: A doctor, a lawyer, the like, but I always thought I would be a professional soccer player.

    What’s your favorite movie?

    That’s a hard one… Definitely a Wes Anderson film!

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Well… Since the pandemic, my tv watching norm has shifted. As of late, I have been hooked to 90 Day Fiance… But I also love crime shows, docu-series, and Bobs Burgers!

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?

    Also a hard one! I am really all over the map from Fleetwood Mac to Lauren Hill to Rolling Stones to Linda Rhondstat to Childish Gambino…

    Favorite song to dance to?

    I’ve been listening to Feels Like Summer a lot recently and that has a good shoulder shimmy to it!

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    Set your life on fire. Seek those who fan your flames.

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    I am one of those types of people that just wants to know it all and I am trying to be okay with more observation.

    By Emily Cox

    Emily is a yoga teacher turned holistic healer. She has a passion for getting upside down and being involved in her community. She is a licensed Holistic Nutritionist and Ashtanga Yoga Instructor with more than 10 years of personal practice and 6 years of teaching experience. She started her own wellness business in 2017 where she preaches the power of personalized nutrition to all of her clients! She specializes in gut health and hormone harmony and believes that with the right guidance, tools, and motivation we can all take back the reigns of our health through sustainable yet systematic practices!

    Check out her specialty course on Omstars, Hormone Harmony 101.

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  • Interview with Rob Mack (3 Min Read)

    Kind, Positive, Non-Judgmental.

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?
    Los Angeles, CA

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?
    I discovered yoga through Kino’s work at Miami Life Center. It’s been an ever-evolving journey.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?
    I feel increasing peace, love, and joy.

    What is yoga to you?
    Yoga is practicing the presence of God (peace, love, and happiness), which we are all infinitely and eternally one with.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?
    My first class was a meditation class, and I feel completely overwhelmed with gratitude.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?
    I was a guy deeply dedicated to being happy, but still finding my way.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?
    As a child and young adult, I was deeply depressed and suicidal. Through practice, I became a much more present person.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?
    Making sense of all the seemingly different and disparate teachings.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?
    Having a random stranger tell me he decided not to kill himself that day because he met me.

    Why do you practice?
    There’s nothing else to do, literally.

    Why do you teach?
    Because I can’t not teach.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?
    Divisiveness (illusory perceptions of separation).

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?
    I love Ramana Maharshi’s “Be As You Are” Osho’s “The Path of Yoga” and “The Alchemy of Yoga,” and “The Yoga Sutras of Pantanjali.”

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?
    Practicing the Presence.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?
    (1) Do it for the joy of it and (2) think of the world as your mat!

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?
    Two new books will be published this upcoming year (2021), “Love from the Inside Out “ and “Success from the Inside Out.”

    What’s your Favorite Book?
    That’s like choosing my favorite organ! Ha! I love all books by Joel Goldsmith and Eckhart Tolle, “Be as You Are” by Ramana Maharshi, “The Cloud of Unknowing” by Anonymous, “Practicing the Presence” by Brother Lawrence, “White Fire” by Mooji, “A Return to Love” by Marianne Williamson, “Ashes of Love” by Rupert Spira, “Mediations” by Marcus Aurelius, “At Your Command” by Neville, “Teachings of Sri Ramakrishna,” “Awareness” by Anthony de Mello,

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?
    A protein shake.

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?
    EVERYTHING is yoga-related in my head! Ha! But I lift weights and read, too…

    Who is your greatest inspiration?
    My mom and dad.

    Do you have a favorite podcast?
    Whichever one I’m featured on that day. Truthfully, I’m more of a reader or even audiobook fan, though.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?
    2 of my favorite books and a boat to drive home.

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
    A professional basketball player.

    What’s your favorite movie?
    The Last Dance, Limitless, The Book of Eli, Horrible Bosses, and the Matrix (sorry – couldn’t choose just one!)

    What’s your favorite TV series?
    The Blacklist, Billions, and Cover Affairs. Don’t judge me.

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?
    Jay-Z, Drake, Michael Jackson, Norah Jones

    Favorite song to dance to?
    “Empire State of Mind.”

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?
    “You are what you seek, and you seek what you are… stop that!”  Also, “Be still and know that I AM.”

    What is your life’s biggest question?
    What’s this all for?

    By Rob Mack

    Robert is a happiness coach & author. He writes and speaks to people about how to live happier lives from the inside, out. Robert’s work has been endorsed by Oprah and Vanessa Williams, among many others. In addition to serving as a Celebrity Love Coach for the television show, Famously Single, on E!, Robert has been a featured guest expert for shows like The Today Show, Good Morning America, Entertainment Tonight, CBS Early Show, The Balancing Act, and AskHer.com and magazines like Self, Health, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, and Upscale. Robert has also served as a National Media Spokesperson, Management Consultant, and Executive Coach for companies like Capital One, FitBit, Buffalo Wild Wings, Microsoft, Carnival Cruise Lines, Deloitte Consulting, McCormick & Spice, IFF, Plus Consulting, and Falcon Credit Management. Robert was born in Pennsylvania. He was educated at Swarthmore College, where he received his Bachelors of Science in Psychology, and the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his Masters in Applied Positive Psychology (M.A.P.P.), an ivy-league degree held by only a few dozen people in the world. Robert lives in Los Angeles.

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  • Interview with Rozel Gonzales

    Dynamic, Passionate, Open

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am Canadian, born and raised in Montréal, Québec, where we speak English and French. My parents, however, come from the Philippines.

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    Yoga became part of my life when I was a student at McGill University. I had a lot on my plate, trying to stay fit, my studies, and work. I figured if I became a fitness and yoga teacher, it was a way for me to achieve a better balance in my life. In the first 10 years, I taught in the gym environment. I taught power yoga style classes, purely focusing on the physicality of the practice. I would cue my students to breathe in and out, but I actually did not really know how to breathe. As the years progressed, I started to yearn for more. I wanted to be a “real” yoga teacher and so I decided to enroll in a traditional teacher training. I had already started taking these new Ashtanga classes with “this guy” named Mark Darby who started renting out space above the local natural food store close to my home in Montreal. Little did I know at the time that Mark Darby was one of Pattabhi Jois’ original students. Mark and his son Shakara became my teachers for many years, my original teachers. Over the years I continue to learn more, traveling each year to learn from teachers like Manju Jois, Jody Manley, and Kino MacGregor. It has been an amazing journey that I am super passionate about. I love to connect with like-minded people and it is an honor to be able to share with others and learn from my students at the same time.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    The catalyst for change for me was when my firstborn son got sick in 2010. He was 5 years old at the time when he was diagnosed with leukemia. It was such a difficult time for our entire family. Yoga is what kept me sane. The community that I had built around yoga and fitness supported me so much through this time. This year my son celebrates 10 years of remission and we are so grateful. Yoga for me today is a way to help others. I use it as a tool to connect with others and to help them shine. I often say I teach Yoga Off the Mat. My goal is to give you a strong body and mind to help you deal with the journey of life… Sure, I can teach you how to stand on your head, but it’s just the by-product of what I am really trying to do.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is my joy. I feel grounded, strong and open after I practice. My mind feels clear and I enjoy the journey of always learning. Yoga is my friend. It is always there when I need it.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?

    Covid-19 has been a challenge. As the owner of a health and wellness centre, I have had to adapt by being, flexible, creative and innovative. Fortunately, we have an amazing team and we have been able to remain viable and strong through virtual and hybrid options. We have an amazing community that continues to support us through this challenge and our innovation is helping us to remain leaders in our community.

    Why do you practice?

    I practice because one day… I want to be a wise old woman. In my mind I am calm, content, happily sitting in colorful tights and legwarmers, levitating in padmasana with lots of grandchildren around me.

    Why do you teach?

    I teach because I love it. I love meeting people, connecting and getting to know the stories of my students. My students keep me motivated to keep learning.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    The Examined Life, Bram Levinson (my friend from Montreal)
    Yoga Mind, Suzan Colon
    The Gift of Imperfection, Brene Brown

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    I think I offer an approachable way to learn yoga and Ashtanga in particular. I am strong, but far from perfect. My backbend needs lots of work…and the intermediate series is still very challenging for me… but I think that is a good thing. Imperfection makes you more authentic and approachable, in my opinion.
    Have you ever had a yoga teacher that you were shy to drink coffee next to? That has happened to me…I promise you, you can drink coffee next to me. Fun fact… one of my students recently said to me. I was so happy when one day I saw you eating a chicken sandwich. Yes, I eat chicken and I do not hide it. People say I am really good at explaining things. I think it is because I was a gymnastics coach for a very long time and my years in the corporate environment allowed me to hone my communication skills. I think its a good combination. I have spent lots of time studying the philosophy of yoga so each class is sprinkled with a positive message from the scriptures, deepening your practice.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Find a teacher that you can connect with. I recommend you research the lineage of your teacher. Find a teacher that will teach more than the postures, a teacher knowledgeable on the philosophy, the breath work and meditation. It will enrich your practice so much more.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    My current project is basically making sure that my health and wellness studio Energie EnCorps, based in Montreal continues to remain steady as we wait for Covid to pass. I have fantastic team of over 30 teachers, therapists and administrative staff that are like family to me. I need to guide this ship through this storm…

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    I love Indian food and lots of spices. I think I was Indian in another life.

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    Palak Paneer, a vegetarian indian dish

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    I also teach ZUMBA! For real!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    I have 3 boys… Luka, Jona and Kai. But my eldest son Luka, who is the cancer survivor is my greatest inspiration. He was just so brave. What is most inspirational is how he has been able to bounce out of that experience with no regrets and still so much passion for life.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    My family, my yoga mat and my ukulele

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Right now I am rewatching the 24 series on Netflix!

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    Little by little, a little becomes a lot…

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    By Rozel Gonzales

    Rozel Gonzales is a passionate yoga teacher, speaker and entrepreneur from Montreal, Canada. Following her son’s battle with cancer in 2010, Rozel left a successful corporate career to follow her dream and open the Energie EnCorps Wellness Centre. The centre is an expression of gratitude for her son’s remission and a platform to promote balanced and healthy living in body and mind. Rozel pours her heart and soul into uplifting others, teaching others to live in the present moment and to take the philosophy of yoga OFF THE MAT and into the world. Rozel has been teaching yoga and fitness since 1997. An Ashtanga trained teacher, she is the lead trainer for the Energie EnCorps Yoga Teacher Training program. Rozel continuously attends workshops and training around the world to update her skills and to build upon the foundations taught to her by her teachers Mark Darby and Manju Jois.

  • Interview with Susanna Barkataki

    I had no idea when I first started learning yoga, reclaiming and practicing the spiritual technologies of my ancestors how much inner power I was about to tap. I simply didn’t realize that I could transform from a shy, quiet, insecure person into a leader that doesn’t flinch at getting on camera or speaking on international stages.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Fiery, caring, passionate.

    About you- Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from England and India. I was born in Middlesbrough, UK – to an Indian father and British mother. My whole life has been shaped by large geopolitical influences! I was born at a time when Indians and White people didn’t marry, let alone date. Despite this, my parents felt an undeniable chemistry and decided to marry – but they couldn’t find anyone to perform the ceremony! They were told they would have to adopt – or they’d have “half-breeds.” Luckily, they decided to have me anyway – but as I was growing up there was so much violence against mixed race families that they had to leave England for a place of more tolerance and chose to move to the United States. This landed us in Los Angeles, where I grew up. Through a few twists of fate, I am now living not far from Kino and your wonderful yoga center in Orlando, Florida on unceded Seminole land.

    What is yoga to you?

    To me, yoga is unity.  Just like people, yoga has a place. It has roots. It has culture. It is from somewhere. You know where you are from. You can probably name the block, city, town, state, country and continent.  And those elements, aunts and uncles, foods, climate, environment – have been a huge part of shaping you for better or for worse. Similarly, yoga is from somewhere. We can’t just surgically remove yoga from its context. From the people, places, religions and society that influenced and influences it. Even though yoga is unity, we have to look at all the places that it’s been used to separate in order to create the true unity it promises us.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    One thing I learned while teaching high school students that all true learning comes from the inside out from an internal, intrinsic motivation. I try to create a space that invites, inspires, opens this curiosity within a person, to be intrinsically motivated to learn how to honor, rather than appropriate yoga.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    “Speak up, miss,” my ESL students used to call out over the lesson I was attempting to teach. I was SO shy when I first started teaching (my first real job after college – I had to put that Philosophy degree from Berkeley to good use!) that my students literally could not hear me! As a quiet, shy, small mixed Indian girl from the UK growing up and then teaching in LA schools, I never imagined I’d be here – one of the go-to people for when people have questions about yoga and cultural issues! But back to me standing there sweating and petrified, I had important things to teach but I was afraid to speak them – those were some of the hardest moments of my life. Because I cared so much about empowering my English as a Second Language students with knowledge (after all, they were immigrants, just like I was, and I wanted them to have a fair chance at success in this brave new world) I simply had to learn to speak up! So I sought out great teachers to learn from and also taught myself how to teach all while learning and practicing the yogic traditions of my roots. Yoga and meditation was such a solace during that hard first year of teaching in LAUSD. And since then, I’ve been speaking up around issues of peace, harmony, nonviolence, equity and inclusion everywhere I can. So now, people look to me sometimes for answers to their questions around cultural issues and yoga. My goal now is the same as it was with those early students in my ESL 1 and 2 classes. To share the best knowledge to empower us all to make a difference and create a better world with yoga.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    I had no idea when I first started learning yoga, reclaiming and practicing the spiritual technologies of my ancestors how much inner power I was about to tap. I simply didn’t realize that I could transform from a shy, quiet, insecure person into a leader that doesn’t flinch at getting on camera or speaking on international stages. But you know, it wasn’t always this way. I used to be terrified to speak in front of a few people, let alone the hundreds and thousands I now teach. Pencils bouncing off desks, voices echoing off walls, one afternoon, my AP English 12th grade class was completely out of control. I’d had it. I took a deep breath and said “Alright, y’all. Shakespeare isn’t working for us right now. Get up, everyone.” I almost couldn’t believe I was about to do this. I’d never shared yoga with anyone else before. “We are going to try something new.” We entered into a 15 minute session of yoga, breathing and ended with meditation. “Let’s just see how it goes,” I said to the students. At the end of the session, they looked at me. Dez, one of the most active and goofy students said, “Miss, I didn’t realize my mind could get so quiet. I’m going to do this every day.” Instead of hiding away the practice that gave me the greatest inner power, I realized part of my job, no matter what I was sharing, was to teach yoga as a practice to inner and outer power and transformation. My teaching and life was completely different after that.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?

    Something I’ve been thinking about a lot is how we are sold yoga in the West. How it is watered down and how that robs us, and future generations of the depth of this powerful practice. And right now – diversity, inclusion & representation are seemingly “on trend.” But addressing representation and appropriation in yoga is “not a boxed to be checked” but rather an exploration to be undertaken, learning to be had, connections to be made!

    Why do you practice, and why do you teach?

    As a child my father chanted in Assamese (our regional language from Assam in North East India) and Sanskrit to help me fall asleep at night. As I lay there, tense, sleep eluding me, I’d try without success, to relax. My dad would smooth my brow, invite me to practice pratyahara and dhyana, mindfulness and meditation. He would invite me to envision a glowing ball of blue energy at my forehead and sing a beautiful chant that his own mother had sung to him. Engulfed in waves of sacred sound and blue light energy I would drift off to sleep. I am a reverent student of the practices from my roots that bring more peace and more power. So much more than asana is part of the fabric of yoga and lends important context to our yoga practice. I’m always so curious to learn! Honoring the spiritual lineage we practice within is so key.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    How to honor and not appropriate yoga – so we can practice the full expanse of what yoga has to offer us.  I BELIEVE IT IS time for yoga to restore the authenticity and diversity it deserves.  Yoga has so much potential. It means unity. But today, it is anything but this. I speak for my ancestors when I say “We are no longer here to allow this corruption and lack of diversity of this healing path. We all lose.” Instead, we can lean back while practicing forward to a future that includes everyone.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I always have a copy of the Bhagavad Gita and the Yoga Sutras somewhere close at hand. I read from them in the morning and in the evening. I prefer these texts translated and with commentary by spiritual teachers. Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global? I’m a teacher, inclusivity promoter, and yoga culture advocate first and foremost. As an inheritor of yogic wisdom, I am passionate about bridging cultural connections and healing with yoga for us and generations to come to experience all that this incredible practice has to offer us. My work is how we can bring the roots of yoga in action with diversity and inclusion. I invite us to explore together as modern day yogis, purpose seekers, coaches, adventurers, mystics, spiritual practitioners, and people who know there is more to the story.  I see a world where yoga is unity and excludes no one. I feel yoga is here for us to cultivate power and transcend our very limitations, personally and socially. Not to create more separation but as a way to connect, dissolving separation within and without.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Always be a student, practice yoga ethics and cultivate your sadhana, or personal practice.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    Yes! I am finishing up my upcoming book Honor Yoga’s Roots: Courageous Ways to Deepen Your Yoga Practice for folks who teach, practice, or want to learn yoga. I’m excited to share this invitation to truly bring your practice alive in a way that deepens and honors yoga’s roots. You can find the book and free resources at susannabarkataki.com/book

    By Susanna Barkataki

    Deepen and Honor your Yoga Practice Here

    An Indian yoga practitioner in the Shankaracharya tradition, Susanna Barkataki supports practitioners to lead with equity, diversity and yogic values while growing thriving practices and businesses with confidence. She is founder of Ignite Yoga and Wellness Institute and runs 200/500 Yoga Teacher Training programs. She is an E-RYT 500, Certified Yoga Therapist with International Association of Yoga Therapists (C-IAYT). Author of the forthcoming book Embrace Yoga’s Roots: Courageous Ways to Deepen Your Yoga Practice. With an Honors degree in Philosophy from UC Berkeley and a Masters in Education from Cambridge College, Barkataki is a diversity, accessibility, inclusivity, and equity (DAIE) yoga unity educator who created the ground-breaking Honor {Don’t Appropriate} Yoga Summit with over 10,000 participants. Learn more and get your free Chapter from her book on indigenous roots of trauma informed yoga at embraceyogasrootsbook.com/  Complimentary masterclass to embrace yoga’s roots without appropriation: www.namastemasterclass.com