• Interview with Emily Cox

    Firey, Silly, Authentic

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from Kansas City Missouri and currently live and work here. However, I would love to move to the beach in the next few years!

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    I was always a very athletic child. I played soccer, basketball, volleyball, the like. I had a full-ride scholarship to college for soccer and decided that I wanted to deviate from the path that was laid out for me, yet felt this yearning for the discipline and structure that I always had from sports. A friend asked me to join her for a hatha yoga class at a local studio. I bounced from studio to studio taking different styles and methods of Yoga until I walked into an Ashtanga class 10 years ago. I was hooked! The discipline, the structure, the rigidity, the spiritually inclined philosophical teachings were everything that I needed at the ripe age of 19. I continue to take classes at that same studio to date and owe so much of my physical, spiritual, and mental growth to this practice.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    Yoga has dramatically shifted my life and my practice has evolved significantly over the years. It creates stability and comfort for me while also providing a strict and disciplined format that I can rely on. The asana practice is like a safe laboratory to explore the often unsafe challenges of the world around us. For this reason, I find everything that I need through the practice.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga to me is a way of exploring the inner self. I feel that our biggest disease in the west is our disconnect with ourselves. Thus, I find that the more I practice, the closer I get to my purest form.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    After my first Yoga class, I remember feeling things I had never felt before. Places in the body, places in the mind and the space between felt as if a veil had been lifted. For this reason, I tell my students to let go of everything they think they know about the body, the mind, the breath, and the practice as every time we step onto our mat we come with a brand new body, set of intentions, stressors, triggers and truamas. So, it is important to view every class regardless of how seasoned you are as you viewed your first: Knowing nothing and ready to learn about not only the practice, but the self.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved, and transformed?

    I was lucky to have found Yoga at a young age, so my life before consisted primarily of going to school, playing soccer, and contemplating life. However, Yoga has deeply changed me since discovering it. My whole life pivoted in the direction of Yoga. I don’t do Yoga, I am Yoga!

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    In the beginning, my intention was actually not to teach. I received my certification in hopes to deepen my own practice. When I arrived home, the studio where I practiced had an opening for an Intro to Ashtanga class on Sunday mornings. I agreed to mentor under the teacher who had been teaching the class for several years prior and ultimately took it over after she left and opened her own studio. I feel it is vital to be authentic & provide a modern take on ancient teachings to the best of your ability.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching, and within the yoga community?

    In my practice & teaching my biggest milestone was myself. I am a type-A person, I guess a lot of us Ashtangis are, huh? Thus, the ego and I have a hot and cold relationship. Within the Yoga community, I have found that it is important to remember that everyone is human.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Practicing with Kino is definitely up there! Although, traveling to India to live and breathe Yoga for 5 weeks wasn’t bad either!

    Why do you practice?

    I practice in order to develop a deeper relationship with myself and the world around me, to transcend the limits of the mind, and to tap into something limitless.

    Why do you teach?

    I teach to share the method of Yoga. This practice is so powerful and so healing for the mind, body, and soul…I feel it’s my duty to be a vessel to pass on the knowledge.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    I feel that saturation is a big issue. Yoga is much like the game of telephone. One person’s Guru told them something which was interpreted by someone else as such and so on and so forth and the next thing you know there is Rage Yoga and Goat Yoga and Beer Yoga and it dilutes the integrity of the method itself.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I highly recommend educational books like:

    • Light on Yoga
    • The Living Gita
    • The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
    • How Yoga Works
    • The Journey Home

    Also anything Kino writes is gold!

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    I feel that my offering is to share a life of health and happiness with everyone around me. To preach the power of personalized nutrition and to spread the message of Yoga!

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Just keep coming! The first few classes are always the most vulnerable and then you’ll be hooked!

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I am currently holding a Mentorship Mastermind Program for new and aspiring Yoga instructors. I will be holding 2 per year! Other than that, I am working on some upcoming events, collaborations, teaching experiences, etc. so just stay in the loop on my Instagram, website or newsletter!

    What’s your Favorite Book?

    All time favorite book is WomanCode. Totally changed my life.

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    I am a sucker for ravioli!

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    My Fiance and I make a mean gf vegan lasagna, mac n cheese & Shakshuka. We also love homemade cesar salads with grilled salmon! I am always experimenting for work and recently we have done a lot of soups… vegan potato soup… to die for! Oh and all of the smoothies, juices, protein balls and anything breakfast all of the time!

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    I have a huge garden with chickens that I tend to! I love to be outside in the sun by the water. I like to read, cook, eat, and i’ll admit it…I indulge in reality TV from time to time!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    Kino! She has really built an empire, yet is incredibly humble despite being one of the most well-spoken and well-read FEMALE individuals in her field. She is an expert and has devoted her life to the practice and I commend her!

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    I love Stuff You Should Know! They are always discussing new and interesting topics, telling crazy stories or recounting historical events. Definitely worth listening to!

    Also MindBodyGreen.

    I also love podcasts on women in business, relationship advice, nutrition and health, science, mindfulness and self-growth

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    Swiss army knife/machete, matches/mirror, sleeping bag (trying to be realistic)

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    I wanted to be a lot of things that kids say they want: A doctor, a lawyer, the like, but I always thought I would be a professional soccer player.

    What’s your favorite movie?

    That’s a hard one… Definitely a Wes Anderson film!

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Well… Since the pandemic, my tv watching norm has shifted. As of late, I have been hooked to 90 Day Fiance… But I also love crime shows, docu-series, and Bobs Burgers!

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?

    Also a hard one! I am really all over the map from Fleetwood Mac to Lauren Hill to Rolling Stones to Linda Rhondstat to Childish Gambino…

    Favorite song to dance to?

    I’ve been listening to Feels Like Summer a lot recently and that has a good shoulder shimmy to it!

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    Set your life on fire. Seek those who fan your flames.

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    I am one of those types of people that just wants to know it all and I am trying to be okay with more observation.

    By Emily Cox

    Emily is a yoga teacher turned holistic healer. She has a passion for getting upside down and being involved in her community. She is a licensed Holistic Nutritionist and Ashtanga Yoga Instructor with more than 10 years of personal practice and 6 years of teaching experience. She started her own wellness business in 2017 where she preaches the power of personalized nutrition to all of her clients! She specializes in gut health and hormone harmony and believes that with the right guidance, tools, and motivation we can all take back the reigns of our health through sustainable yet systematic practices!

    Check out her specialty course on Omstars, Hormone Harmony 101.

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  • Interview with Rob Mack (3 Min Read)

    Kind, Positive, Non-Judgmental.

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?
    Los Angeles, CA

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?
    I discovered yoga through Kino’s work at Miami Life Center. It’s been an ever-evolving journey.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?
    I feel increasing peace, love, and joy.

    What is yoga to you?
    Yoga is practicing the presence of God (peace, love, and happiness), which we are all infinitely and eternally one with.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?
    My first class was a meditation class, and I feel completely overwhelmed with gratitude.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?
    I was a guy deeply dedicated to being happy, but still finding my way.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?
    As a child and young adult, I was deeply depressed and suicidal. Through practice, I became a much more present person.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?
    Making sense of all the seemingly different and disparate teachings.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?
    Having a random stranger tell me he decided not to kill himself that day because he met me.

    Why do you practice?
    There’s nothing else to do, literally.

    Why do you teach?
    Because I can’t not teach.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?
    Divisiveness (illusory perceptions of separation).

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?
    I love Ramana Maharshi’s “Be As You Are” Osho’s “The Path of Yoga” and “The Alchemy of Yoga,” and “The Yoga Sutras of Pantanjali.”

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?
    Practicing the Presence.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?
    (1) Do it for the joy of it and (2) think of the world as your mat!

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?
    Two new books will be published this upcoming year (2021), “Love from the Inside Out “ and “Success from the Inside Out.”

    What’s your Favorite Book?
    That’s like choosing my favorite organ! Ha! I love all books by Joel Goldsmith and Eckhart Tolle, “Be as You Are” by Ramana Maharshi, “The Cloud of Unknowing” by Anonymous, “Practicing the Presence” by Brother Lawrence, “White Fire” by Mooji, “A Return to Love” by Marianne Williamson, “Ashes of Love” by Rupert Spira, “Mediations” by Marcus Aurelius, “At Your Command” by Neville, “Teachings of Sri Ramakrishna,” “Awareness” by Anthony de Mello,

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?
    A protein shake.

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?
    EVERYTHING is yoga-related in my head! Ha! But I lift weights and read, too…

    Who is your greatest inspiration?
    My mom and dad.

    Do you have a favorite podcast?
    Whichever one I’m featured on that day. Truthfully, I’m more of a reader or even audiobook fan, though.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?
    2 of my favorite books and a boat to drive home.

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
    A professional basketball player.

    What’s your favorite movie?
    The Last Dance, Limitless, The Book of Eli, Horrible Bosses, and the Matrix (sorry – couldn’t choose just one!)

    What’s your favorite TV series?
    The Blacklist, Billions, and Cover Affairs. Don’t judge me.

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?
    Jay-Z, Drake, Michael Jackson, Norah Jones

    Favorite song to dance to?
    “Empire State of Mind.”

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?
    “You are what you seek, and you seek what you are… stop that!”  Also, “Be still and know that I AM.”

    What is your life’s biggest question?
    What’s this all for?

    By Rob Mack

    Robert is a happiness coach & author. He writes and speaks to people about how to live happier lives from the inside, out. Robert’s work has been endorsed by Oprah and Vanessa Williams, among many others. In addition to serving as a Celebrity Love Coach for the television show, Famously Single, on E!, Robert has been a featured guest expert for shows like The Today Show, Good Morning America, Entertainment Tonight, CBS Early Show, The Balancing Act, and AskHer.com and magazines like Self, Health, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, and Upscale. Robert has also served as a National Media Spokesperson, Management Consultant, and Executive Coach for companies like Capital One, FitBit, Buffalo Wild Wings, Microsoft, Carnival Cruise Lines, Deloitte Consulting, McCormick & Spice, IFF, Plus Consulting, and Falcon Credit Management. Robert was born in Pennsylvania. He was educated at Swarthmore College, where he received his Bachelors of Science in Psychology, and the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his Masters in Applied Positive Psychology (M.A.P.P.), an ivy-league degree held by only a few dozen people in the world. Robert lives in Los Angeles.

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  • Interview with Rozel Gonzales

    Dynamic, Passionate, Open

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am Canadian, born and raised in Montréal, Québec, where we speak English and French. My parents, however, come from the Philippines.

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    Yoga became part of my life when I was a student at McGill University. I had a lot on my plate, trying to stay fit, my studies, and work. I figured if I became a fitness and yoga teacher, it was a way for me to achieve a better balance in my life. In the first 10 years, I taught in the gym environment. I taught power yoga style classes, purely focusing on the physicality of the practice. I would cue my students to breathe in and out, but I actually did not really know how to breathe. As the years progressed, I started to yearn for more. I wanted to be a “real” yoga teacher and so I decided to enroll in a traditional teacher training. I had already started taking these new Ashtanga classes with “this guy” named Mark Darby who started renting out space above the local natural food store close to my home in Montreal. Little did I know at the time that Mark Darby was one of Pattabhi Jois’ original students. Mark and his son Shakara became my teachers for many years, my original teachers. Over the years I continue to learn more, traveling each year to learn from teachers like Manju Jois, Jody Manley, and Kino MacGregor. It has been an amazing journey that I am super passionate about. I love to connect with like-minded people and it is an honor to be able to share with others and learn from my students at the same time.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    The catalyst for change for me was when my firstborn son got sick in 2010. He was 5 years old at the time when he was diagnosed with leukemia. It was such a difficult time for our entire family. Yoga is what kept me sane. The community that I had built around yoga and fitness supported me so much through this time. This year my son celebrates 10 years of remission and we are so grateful. Yoga for me today is a way to help others. I use it as a tool to connect with others and to help them shine. I often say I teach Yoga Off the Mat. My goal is to give you a strong body and mind to help you deal with the journey of life… Sure, I can teach you how to stand on your head, but it’s just the by-product of what I am really trying to do.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is my joy. I feel grounded, strong and open after I practice. My mind feels clear and I enjoy the journey of always learning. Yoga is my friend. It is always there when I need it.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?

    Covid-19 has been a challenge. As the owner of a health and wellness centre, I have had to adapt by being, flexible, creative and innovative. Fortunately, we have an amazing team and we have been able to remain viable and strong through virtual and hybrid options. We have an amazing community that continues to support us through this challenge and our innovation is helping us to remain leaders in our community.

    Why do you practice?

    I practice because one day… I want to be a wise old woman. In my mind I am calm, content, happily sitting in colorful tights and legwarmers, levitating in padmasana with lots of grandchildren around me.

    Why do you teach?

    I teach because I love it. I love meeting people, connecting and getting to know the stories of my students. My students keep me motivated to keep learning.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    The Examined Life, Bram Levinson (my friend from Montreal)
    Yoga Mind, Suzan Colon
    The Gift of Imperfection, Brene Brown

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    I think I offer an approachable way to learn yoga and Ashtanga in particular. I am strong, but far from perfect. My backbend needs lots of work…and the intermediate series is still very challenging for me… but I think that is a good thing. Imperfection makes you more authentic and approachable, in my opinion.
    Have you ever had a yoga teacher that you were shy to drink coffee next to? That has happened to me…I promise you, you can drink coffee next to me. Fun fact… one of my students recently said to me. I was so happy when one day I saw you eating a chicken sandwich. Yes, I eat chicken and I do not hide it. People say I am really good at explaining things. I think it is because I was a gymnastics coach for a very long time and my years in the corporate environment allowed me to hone my communication skills. I think its a good combination. I have spent lots of time studying the philosophy of yoga so each class is sprinkled with a positive message from the scriptures, deepening your practice.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Find a teacher that you can connect with. I recommend you research the lineage of your teacher. Find a teacher that will teach more than the postures, a teacher knowledgeable on the philosophy, the breath work and meditation. It will enrich your practice so much more.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    My current project is basically making sure that my health and wellness studio Energie EnCorps, based in Montreal continues to remain steady as we wait for Covid to pass. I have fantastic team of over 30 teachers, therapists and administrative staff that are like family to me. I need to guide this ship through this storm…

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    I love Indian food and lots of spices. I think I was Indian in another life.

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    Palak Paneer, a vegetarian indian dish

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    I also teach ZUMBA! For real!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    I have 3 boys… Luka, Jona and Kai. But my eldest son Luka, who is the cancer survivor is my greatest inspiration. He was just so brave. What is most inspirational is how he has been able to bounce out of that experience with no regrets and still so much passion for life.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    My family, my yoga mat and my ukulele

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Right now I am rewatching the 24 series on Netflix!

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    Little by little, a little becomes a lot…

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    By Rozel Gonzales

    Rozel Gonzales is a passionate yoga teacher, speaker and entrepreneur from Montreal, Canada. Following her son’s battle with cancer in 2010, Rozel left a successful corporate career to follow her dream and open the Energie EnCorps Wellness Centre. The centre is an expression of gratitude for her son’s remission and a platform to promote balanced and healthy living in body and mind. Rozel pours her heart and soul into uplifting others, teaching others to live in the present moment and to take the philosophy of yoga OFF THE MAT and into the world. Rozel has been teaching yoga and fitness since 1997. An Ashtanga trained teacher, she is the lead trainer for the Energie EnCorps Yoga Teacher Training program. Rozel continuously attends workshops and training around the world to update her skills and to build upon the foundations taught to her by her teachers Mark Darby and Manju Jois.

  • Interview with Susanna Barkataki

    I had no idea when I first started learning yoga, reclaiming and practicing the spiritual technologies of my ancestors how much inner power I was about to tap. I simply didn’t realize that I could transform from a shy, quiet, insecure person into a leader that doesn’t flinch at getting on camera or speaking on international stages.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Fiery, caring, passionate.

    About you- Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from England and India. I was born in Middlesbrough, UK – to an Indian father and British mother. My whole life has been shaped by large geopolitical influences! I was born at a time when Indians and White people didn’t marry, let alone date. Despite this, my parents felt an undeniable chemistry and decided to marry – but they couldn’t find anyone to perform the ceremony! They were told they would have to adopt – or they’d have “half-breeds.” Luckily, they decided to have me anyway – but as I was growing up there was so much violence against mixed race families that they had to leave England for a place of more tolerance and chose to move to the United States. This landed us in Los Angeles, where I grew up. Through a few twists of fate, I am now living not far from Kino and your wonderful yoga center in Orlando, Florida on unceded Seminole land.

    What is yoga to you?

    To me, yoga is unity.  Just like people, yoga has a place. It has roots. It has culture. It is from somewhere. You know where you are from. You can probably name the block, city, town, state, country and continent.  And those elements, aunts and uncles, foods, climate, environment – have been a huge part of shaping you for better or for worse. Similarly, yoga is from somewhere. We can’t just surgically remove yoga from its context. From the people, places, religions and society that influenced and influences it. Even though yoga is unity, we have to look at all the places that it’s been used to separate in order to create the true unity it promises us.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    One thing I learned while teaching high school students that all true learning comes from the inside out from an internal, intrinsic motivation. I try to create a space that invites, inspires, opens this curiosity within a person, to be intrinsically motivated to learn how to honor, rather than appropriate yoga.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    “Speak up, miss,” my ESL students used to call out over the lesson I was attempting to teach. I was SO shy when I first started teaching (my first real job after college – I had to put that Philosophy degree from Berkeley to good use!) that my students literally could not hear me! As a quiet, shy, small mixed Indian girl from the UK growing up and then teaching in LA schools, I never imagined I’d be here – one of the go-to people for when people have questions about yoga and cultural issues! But back to me standing there sweating and petrified, I had important things to teach but I was afraid to speak them – those were some of the hardest moments of my life. Because I cared so much about empowering my English as a Second Language students with knowledge (after all, they were immigrants, just like I was, and I wanted them to have a fair chance at success in this brave new world) I simply had to learn to speak up! So I sought out great teachers to learn from and also taught myself how to teach all while learning and practicing the yogic traditions of my roots. Yoga and meditation was such a solace during that hard first year of teaching in LAUSD. And since then, I’ve been speaking up around issues of peace, harmony, nonviolence, equity and inclusion everywhere I can. So now, people look to me sometimes for answers to their questions around cultural issues and yoga. My goal now is the same as it was with those early students in my ESL 1 and 2 classes. To share the best knowledge to empower us all to make a difference and create a better world with yoga.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    I had no idea when I first started learning yoga, reclaiming and practicing the spiritual technologies of my ancestors how much inner power I was about to tap. I simply didn’t realize that I could transform from a shy, quiet, insecure person into a leader that doesn’t flinch at getting on camera or speaking on international stages. But you know, it wasn’t always this way. I used to be terrified to speak in front of a few people, let alone the hundreds and thousands I now teach. Pencils bouncing off desks, voices echoing off walls, one afternoon, my AP English 12th grade class was completely out of control. I’d had it. I took a deep breath and said “Alright, y’all. Shakespeare isn’t working for us right now. Get up, everyone.” I almost couldn’t believe I was about to do this. I’d never shared yoga with anyone else before. “We are going to try something new.” We entered into a 15 minute session of yoga, breathing and ended with meditation. “Let’s just see how it goes,” I said to the students. At the end of the session, they looked at me. Dez, one of the most active and goofy students said, “Miss, I didn’t realize my mind could get so quiet. I’m going to do this every day.” Instead of hiding away the practice that gave me the greatest inner power, I realized part of my job, no matter what I was sharing, was to teach yoga as a practice to inner and outer power and transformation. My teaching and life was completely different after that.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?

    Something I’ve been thinking about a lot is how we are sold yoga in the West. How it is watered down and how that robs us, and future generations of the depth of this powerful practice. And right now – diversity, inclusion & representation are seemingly “on trend.” But addressing representation and appropriation in yoga is “not a boxed to be checked” but rather an exploration to be undertaken, learning to be had, connections to be made!

    Why do you practice, and why do you teach?

    As a child my father chanted in Assamese (our regional language from Assam in North East India) and Sanskrit to help me fall asleep at night. As I lay there, tense, sleep eluding me, I’d try without success, to relax. My dad would smooth my brow, invite me to practice pratyahara and dhyana, mindfulness and meditation. He would invite me to envision a glowing ball of blue energy at my forehead and sing a beautiful chant that his own mother had sung to him. Engulfed in waves of sacred sound and blue light energy I would drift off to sleep. I am a reverent student of the practices from my roots that bring more peace and more power. So much more than asana is part of the fabric of yoga and lends important context to our yoga practice. I’m always so curious to learn! Honoring the spiritual lineage we practice within is so key.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    How to honor and not appropriate yoga – so we can practice the full expanse of what yoga has to offer us.  I BELIEVE IT IS time for yoga to restore the authenticity and diversity it deserves.  Yoga has so much potential. It means unity. But today, it is anything but this. I speak for my ancestors when I say “We are no longer here to allow this corruption and lack of diversity of this healing path. We all lose.” Instead, we can lean back while practicing forward to a future that includes everyone.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I always have a copy of the Bhagavad Gita and the Yoga Sutras somewhere close at hand. I read from them in the morning and in the evening. I prefer these texts translated and with commentary by spiritual teachers. Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global? I’m a teacher, inclusivity promoter, and yoga culture advocate first and foremost. As an inheritor of yogic wisdom, I am passionate about bridging cultural connections and healing with yoga for us and generations to come to experience all that this incredible practice has to offer us. My work is how we can bring the roots of yoga in action with diversity and inclusion. I invite us to explore together as modern day yogis, purpose seekers, coaches, adventurers, mystics, spiritual practitioners, and people who know there is more to the story.  I see a world where yoga is unity and excludes no one. I feel yoga is here for us to cultivate power and transcend our very limitations, personally and socially. Not to create more separation but as a way to connect, dissolving separation within and without.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Always be a student, practice yoga ethics and cultivate your sadhana, or personal practice.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    Yes! I am finishing up my upcoming book Honor Yoga’s Roots: Courageous Ways to Deepen Your Yoga Practice for folks who teach, practice, or want to learn yoga. I’m excited to share this invitation to truly bring your practice alive in a way that deepens and honors yoga’s roots. You can find the book and free resources at susannabarkataki.com/book

    By Susanna Barkataki

    Deepen and Honor your Yoga Practice Here

    An Indian yoga practitioner in the Shankaracharya tradition, Susanna Barkataki supports practitioners to lead with equity, diversity and yogic values while growing thriving practices and businesses with confidence. She is founder of Ignite Yoga and Wellness Institute and runs 200/500 Yoga Teacher Training programs. She is an E-RYT 500, Certified Yoga Therapist with International Association of Yoga Therapists (C-IAYT). Author of the forthcoming book Embrace Yoga’s Roots: Courageous Ways to Deepen Your Yoga Practice. With an Honors degree in Philosophy from UC Berkeley and a Masters in Education from Cambridge College, Barkataki is a diversity, accessibility, inclusivity, and equity (DAIE) yoga unity educator who created the ground-breaking Honor {Don’t Appropriate} Yoga Summit with over 10,000 participants. Learn more and get your free Chapter from her book on indigenous roots of trauma informed yoga at embraceyogasrootsbook.com/  Complimentary masterclass to embrace yoga’s roots without appropriation: www.namastemasterclass.com

  • Yoga Teacher Interview with Cristi Christensen Part 2

    I want to wake people up. I want to shake people up. I want to bring these practices of yoga, and dance, and music to every single corner of the world. I want to help people feel grounded in their bodies, integrated with who they are, and help them stoke the belief in themselves, that they can do everything and anything that they put their energy and attention towards.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice?

    My whole life had been driven about competition.  I was competing at a very young age, training at an elite level from the time I was ten years old.  Training eight hours a day.  It was all about competition and what the body could do. I would say by the time I came to yoga that I didn’t know what movement was that wasn’t in the name of competition. Whether it was for dance and being picked to be in the performance, or to be picked to go to special school, or was it to train your body so you could jump higher, flip faster, get into the water with no splash.  All the movement had a very specific reason to achieve a goal.  I think the biggest struggle, maybe at first, would have been to like, A) this is not about competition B) it’s actually not even about what poses I can do.  And letting go of that, and just allowing the practice to be a practice, because that was very foreign to me, but also because I had done so much athletics in that way, it was almost a relief that it didn’t have to be that way.  Once I got that. This isn’t about me learning handstand, it’s not me being able to put my foot to my head, but I had never done anything that wasn’t goal oriented movement before. Once I got over that I felt such freedom in the practice and I enjoyed it so much more.  It was about the love of being in my body.  The love of being present with the sensations that were in my body.  Also being connected to the other people on their mats, or being connected to the teacher, and the energy we were creating together.  It was getting over the fact it was okay, that based on my injury, that I couldn’t do some of these “advanced poses” and that wasn’t going to limit me in the potential of how my yoga practice could serve me. I think getting over that was a pretty big milestone for me.

    What is yoga favorite yoga pose and why?

    One of my favorite poses is handstand, and it’s just because it’s fun. I’m not practicing handstands on ledges. I just do it for fun. It reminds me of being a kid. It opens up that exuberant energy in me more and more. I just like to be upside down. There’s that monkey in me from being gymnast and a diver from a young age that still really enjoys that. I also really like Shivasana [laughs] because I think we’re all really tired and having that deep rest, like having that permission for deep rest is really welcome a lot of the time.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga teacher?

    One of the things I’m known for is this yoga dance collaboration.  It comes in two forms. One is called Sol Fire and the other one is called Deep Exhale.  It is a combination of meditation, movement meditation, yoga, dance, eccstatic dance, and going back into yoga, and sound healing.  It has been one of the practices that has brought me so much joy to share. It’s been so healing for my own life and seeing the response, like actually, the visceral response in people’s faces and people’s bodies from these experiences.  I feel bad sometimes because I’m getting so much from it, that I’m like, “I hope my students are getting half as much as I am.”  There was one in particular experience, it was in 2017 at the Lightning in a Bottle Festival.  It was the Deep Exhale with my partner Marques Wyatt, he is a world renowned DJ.  It was like a vortex in this tent. We had about 700 people, and there were as many people surrounding the tent as that were inside.  The whole tent was pulsing with energy.  Everyone was jumping and lifting.  Feeling that energy and connecting with the students in that way, and seeing the ripple effect of this positive alignment and connection when we connect to what’s inside, and how we can allow it to express out. Really witnessing the reason why we put this yoga dance together and witnessing it being revealed in front of us. This really does work, and this really does light people up.  And it’s really bringing people into their power, and they’re having a really amazing time in the process.  That is one that in that moment it was, like, wow, this is it. This is it.

    Why do you practice? 

    I practice because I have to [laughs].  And I don’t mean that in a negative way.  I practice because this is the tool that helps me stay on my path of life. If yoga is life, then everything is my practice.  Setting up my alter, is my practice. Rolling out my mat, is my practice.  Playing my drum, is my practice.  Writing, is my practice.  And all of those, to me, are yoga.  Those are the practices that I need to stay sane [laughs].  to feel connected to who I am, to feel connected to the Earth below me, and to feel connected to infinite above me. I need these practices and they continue to feed me on a very deep level, and light me up, and support me in those times where I need the extra support and I need to be held by something.  The energy of these practices I can lean into and can hold me.

    Why do you teach? 

    Because I can’t not.  I do not want anyone to not have access to these practices that have helped me. I assume if they have helped me, they’re going to help other people. I teach because I want to share, with people, the transformative power of yoga in all forms.  So that it can be of service to as many people on this planet as possible.  Honestly, I’ll also say, I’m my best self when I’m teaching.  I hope I can continue to become a better person through becoming a better teacher.

    What’s your favorite yoga quote or mantra?

    My favorite mantra is, ah-hum pray-mah, ah-hum pray-mah, ah-hum pray-mah.  I am divine love. I am divine love, and I am divine love.  If we can have every cell of our body vibrating at that remembrance of exactly who we are, being divine love, that our families, or communities, or world, are going to be a much better place.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    Inclusivity.  That you do not have to be a certain size, sex, weight, sexual preference, religion, culture, socioeconomic status to be a part of this practice. That we can open up the doors to bring these practices to everyone, so no one is left out, and no one feels left out. That they have to be a certain thing to be able to do yoga and to have this healing modality of what yoga is. I really think making this practice not a practice that’s just for the privileged, and that is a practice that is for everyone.  There are other benefits of how social media is reaching more people to bring yoga together, but I think that, for me, is really wanting to open a) what yoga is, and b) to make it so inclusive that everyone can benefit from this practice in the way I have, or in their own unique way.

    All of us embracing our shadow.  That yoga is not just peace and love and everything is going to be rainbows and sunshine and unicorns just because I’m doing yoga.  There is this notion sometimes that yoga is only about this liberation toward the light.  And, of course, that is part of the practice, but we can’t truly liberate and find freedom until we go down into ourselves. Until we go down into our bodies, go down into the really the guts of it.  To go down even into the metaphor of the Earth, into the dark fertile soils, back into the womb and address what is the root of everything.  So that we’re not suppressing, we’re not denying, we are not further oppressing anything, and putting this spiritual, “oh but it’s all peace and light,” gaze over it all. I want to say that as a community at large as an individual for myself, so much of my work is about embracing the shadow versus turning my back to it, and doing the work necessary so that I can transform.  So I can liberate.  So I can truly find freedom, and I’m also not going to harm another in that process.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    My favorite book that travels around the world with me, everywhere I go, it’s very batted up, is called the Radiant Sutras.  It is by Dr. Lorin Roche, who is one of my teachers and mentors.  It’s poetry as far as I’m concerned. It’s different, it’s basically the awe and wonder, gateways into the awe and wonder of what it is to be alive.  It’s a conversation between the God and the Goddess, about life.  And it’s different gateways, we could say, into meditation.  Each of these sutras are just dripping with poetic beautiful words. I am in love with the language.  It’s a living breathing text.  That is, hands down, my favorite yogic text.  Check it out, for sure.

    What is your dharma, your life mission?

    There are still parts of it that are being defined, and I know that.  Right now, one of them is, I want to wake people up. I want to shake people up. I want to bring these practices of yoga, and dance, and music to every single corner of the world. I want to help people feel grounded in their bodies, integrated with who they are and help them stoke the belief in themselves, that they can do everything and anything that they put their energy and attention towards. I want to inspire, I want to empower.  I want to get people moving and breathing in a really conscious, but fun, way.  That’s my mission right now.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Find a practice, and a teacher, that you deeply resonate with.

    By Cristi Christensen

    Practice Yoga with Cristi on Omstars

  • Yoga Teacher Interview with Cristi Christensen Part 1

    I want people to feel connected to who they are, and comfortable and strong in their bodies. I want their spirit to soar. I want to help them, inspire them, to feel that.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Fun, Fiery, and Fierce.

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from Brooklyn, New York, but I’m now “based” in Los Angeles.  I am more of a resident of the world, right now, as I am traveling about 70% of the time! So, I have a very expensive storage unit, a.k.a., a studio apartment in Los Angeles that is empty most of the time. But it is still where I return to again, and again, and again–and what feels like home in my heart.

    How long have you been practicing yoga and why did you start practicing yoga?

    I did my first yoga class around 2002.  I didn’t fall in love with yoga immediately.  What lead me to the practice was: I was an athlete, I was training for the 2004 Olympics in the sport of Platform Diving, and I broke my back.  That put a devastating end to my Olympic pursuit and throughout the healing process I was doing a lot of Pilates, a lot of physical therapy. And then, someone at that time was like, “I’ve been doing yoga, and I think you’ll really like it,” and I knew nothing, nothing, nothing about the practice, at the time.  The only thing I knew about it was that Madonna had been raving about it, and her body was amazing! So, I was like, “Sure, I’ll try yoga!” But I didn’t know it was anything more than exercise. I had no other context because it wasn’t in the mainstream like it is in any fashion, today.

    I went to the first class and the one thing I really noticed was that the teacher instructed every single breath.  I didn’t even know what style of yoga I was practicing. I do know, now, that it was the primary series of Ashtanga, but it was led.  I thought that was the only kind of yoga there was, and there were a lot of things I still couldn’t do because of my injury. I remember this idea of being just aware of my breath movement by movement and moment by moment that I’d never had that quality of attention to before.  It really sparked a sense of my own curiosity. And I was like, “hmm, what is this?” And it was more based on the curiosity that I continued versus this whole notion of immediately falling in love with the practice. And then, fast forward, a couple of years I moved to New York City and I was working for a company called Exhale, Mind Body Spa.

    Shiva Rea was coming to teach in New York for the first time in, I guess, a really long time. I had no idea who she was, I had no idea there were famous yoga teachers–still had very little context of this whole yoga thing.  People were talking about her like she was the Madonna of yoga. So, I was like, “Okay, I gotta find out what this is,” and at that point I had never even taken a yoga class that had music. It was after I actually took that class with her, something awoken in me.  I didn’t understand the energy-body before, what the energy-body was, or even what a spiritual-body was. I grew up religious, not spiritual, and didn’t even know there was a difference. And there was something that happened in that class that I was like, “Whoa, whatever this is…I want more of it.”  And then, I just kind of became ravenous in my exploration of this thing called yoga.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is life.  Yoga is this unification, or maybe, the goal of life of how we bring absolute presence and consciousnesses and unification of all parts of who we are to any given moment, and in everything we do.  Whether it’s in a conversation we’re having, or showing up for our job. Or if it’s showing up for our partner, or our child. Or just showing up for ourselves. Yoga to me is really how I view life and the goal of bringing out whole self to participate and coming into unification of mind-body-heart-spirit-soul.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class?

    That feeling of curiosity and that feeling of attention with the breath.  I definitely was struggling a little bit at that time because my dream of what I’d been training for my whole life at that point had come down and I lost my identity. So, I was definitely having my own struggle in that capacity.

    How do you want students to feel after they practice with you?

    I want them to feel more connected to who they are. For me this is a practice of waking up to all the energy that you behold.  I want people to feel connected to who they are, and comfortable and strong in their bodies. I want their spirit to soar. I want to help them, inspire them to feel that.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? 

    I think yoga has affected every part of my life.  When I started practicing, even when I would say that switching point of falling in love and ravenously wanting to learn more about the practice, I never ever had the intention to teach.  It became something I was studying and became something I just wanted to know more about. Yoga has become my career. It’s more than my career. The definition of yoga is life, but really, yoga has become my life. Everything I do is related to this practice in some way.  Yoga has touched every aspect of my life. I would say the first thing is it has brought me back into my body.

    I didn’t realize I wasn’t fully in my body until I was very deep into my yoga journey.  It’s helped me become comfortable in my body, being comfortable and confident in my own skin.  So, on a very personal level, that is one of the huge benefits I’ve received. It’s helped me develop a relationship with spirit, and to connect me to what I’m calling, the infinite.  The infinite is many, many things.  My connection to nature, my connection to the cycles, and the rhythms of life.  The connection to the sun and the moon, and the connection to the God/Goddess. So, yoga has touched me very deeply and transformed my life in a huge way from that capacity alone because I had no former connection to those things.  I feel like the practice has also helped transform my body.

    I was told at 24 when I had the massive injury that I would be walking with a cane by the time I was 30.  And now, I’m in my early 40’s. I can’t do some of the most fancy poses of yoga, I don’t have a practice as deep as Kino’s, and being able to do all these amazing back bends, and what-not, because of the injury.  But I am not limited in my life, in any way, because of it. It has definitely transformed my body, as well. I really think the effects of yoga, for me, have been very tangible mind, body, and spirit.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what makes a good yoga teacher?

    I didn’t actually decide, it just happened. It got to a point where I could not, not share something that was transforming and awakening me in such a way that I could not, not share any longer. I was also in the yoga business, but I was in the business of managing other teachers. I was managing studios, I was managing retreat centers for this company, Exhale Mind Body Spa. I was also teaching other things. I was teaching Pilates and their proprietary class called Core Fusion, but yoga was still what I was keeping sacred to me.  There got to be a point where I could not, not share what became the guide post of my life.

    What style of yoga do you practice and what makes that style most effective? 

    I practice yoga under the, I’m going to call it, the very wide umbrella of Vinyasa. Vinyasa only means to move in a special way, to move with intelligence. To move with consciousness, to move with awareness. It gives me a tremendous amount of freedom to explore.  To explore the body and the breath in many different ways so I can be stagnant, I can be flowing, I can be dynamic, I can be settled. I can incorporate into my practices all of what I have been doing my entire life. I was a dancer, I was an athlete. I recovered from all of these injuries.

    The Vinyasa gives me freedom to bring together all the different modalities I’ve done up to now and infuse them into my yoga practice in a really beautiful way.  Sometimes it might look more like a dance. Sometimes it might have more of a core fiery focus, but it still goes back to why yoga is important to me. And that is to connect back to body, to connect back to the soul, and connect back to the heart. My practice looks very different all the time. It’s not the same everyday when I come to my mat.

    Do you have a teacher in your style of yoga?

    I don’t have a specific teacher in “my style” of yoga, but I have some amazing people that have influenced, of course, the way I teach. And of course taught me so much of the knowledge that I now have.  Ranging from Shiva Rea to Seane Corn, Sianna Sherman, Lorin Roche, Laura Amazzone, Saul David Raye. Annie Carpenter, to Maty Ezraty. I have had the really good fortune of being able to be blessed by a lot of really beautiful teachers when I ran a yoga studio Exhale Sacred Movement in Venice, California.  All of these teachers were resident teachers there. I really got to dive in deep with them in a really beautiful way, and they definitely have impacted, consciously and unconsciously, the way I teach now.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I am pretty much working on the biggest project of my life, right now.  I’m in the process of writing a book called Chakra Rituals: Awakening the Wild Woman Within.  As the chakras and elements are my favorite thing to teach on and to share on because they’re so rich and so deep, and give us an incredible map and context in which we can look at our bodies and look at that connection to everything.  And all the different energies that we are. Coming Winter of 2021, I’ll have my first book coming out. I’m really excited. Something I thought I would do one day, and now I am doing it now.

    Also, coming up, I have some really great retreats. I am going to Costa Rica this April 4th to the 11th, and I am teaming up with Toni Bergins, who is the creator of JourneyDance. It’s one of the most transformative dance experiences that I have ever witnessed.  We met and we completely fell in love with each other, and we’re like, we have to collaborate.  We are doing our first retreat together in Nosara at the Blue Spirit, an amazing retreat center in Nosara, Costa Rica this April.  I haven’t been this excited about a collaboration in a long time. This is going to be super cool.  And then in September of 2020 I’m doing a European retreat in Italy, right outside of Florence, right in between Florence and Tuscany with another dear sister from Vienna named, Alexia, and that is two of the big things I’m really looking forward to next year!

    I’m really excited to be sharing this [Elemental Sol Flow] program with you. To have had Sol Rising, the amazing music producer and DJ doing all the original score.  He is actually DJ-ing on the set of the classes, it’s super special as we are friends and co-creators.  To share that with him, and bring these elements to life through the practices. Through the asana, through the music, and through my voice.

    By Cristi Christensen

    Practice Yoga with Cristi on Omstars

  • Interview with Marie Belle

    Yoga is the understanding that there is no separation. As a practice, I use movement, asana, meditation, and breath to step into that current of just knowing, being, and allowing any transformation to take place as it needs.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Chill. Driven. Receptive

    Where are you from and/or where do you live? 

    I am from Puerto Rico, currently living in DC

    How long have you been practicing yoga and why did you start practicing yoga?

    I started practicing yoga in 2007 right after the shootings at Virginia Tech. I started as a way to mindfully move into my body and begin to trust and come back to life.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is the understanding that there is no separation. As a practice, I use movement, asana, meditation, and breath to step into that current of just knowing, being, and allowing any transformation to take place as it needs.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you want students to feel after they practice with you?

    I felt super tall and light and like I just achieved something within myself. I wanted to return as soon as possible. I would love my students to feel more centered, empowered, and alive.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    Yoga has completely transformed my life, my movements, my profession, thought patterns, relationship dialogues, everything really. I was very much a scripted person before yoga; I wanted to always be seen a particular way and I followed cultural norms to the best of my abilities. I fulfilled all my expectations with school and profession (I received a Ph.D. in Psychology and Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies), and still felt empty. Once I found yoga, I slowly started integrating all aspects of myself: the athlete, the teacher, the artist, the hermit, the seeker. I feel more integrated and complete without any cultural scripts.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what makes a good yoga teacher?

    I started teaching donation only classes as a side gig to raise money for a non-profit. At the time I was training to Bike Across The US for MS, and wanted to support their mission. Gradually I got asked to teach more and more classes and I just kept saying yes.  A good yoga teacher is one who practices, spends time alone daily, checking in with her/him self, body, system, deepest wisdom. One who is receptive, kind, and clear.

    What style of yoga do you practice and what makes that style most effective? Do you have a teacher in your style of yoga?

    I practice Ashtanga mostly, Dharma every now and then, and my version of Yin and Restorative. I don’t think one is most effective for everyone, but for me, Ashtanga works. It demands more and more of me all while showing me all my potentials and all the ways I limit and sabotage myself. It’s a super powerful and transformative practice; very demanding, unforgiving, and inspiring all at once. It has helped calm and regulate my nervous system in ways no other practice has. I also love Dharma Yoga, I see it as a perfect complement to Ashtanga’s straight lines and structure. Dharma yoga invites me to be more devotional, less rigid, calmer, and receptive; more curvilinear. I love and practice Ashtanga Yoga with Tim Feldmann, Faith Scimecca, and David Robson. I practice Dharma Yoga with Dharma Mittra.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice?  

    Injury and dogma.

    What is yoga favorite yoga pose and why? And what’s your least favorite yoga pose and why?

    I like any hip opener and back bends. They’re just so crucial in helping me remain spacious and grounded and receptive.  My least favorite yoga pose: I can’t think of one. 

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Healing from injury, healing from heartbreak, learning to accept myself, and love my body.

    And how about as a teacher?

    Seeing my students move beyond limitations just from a simple comment or them learning how to do something they never thought possible.

    Why do you practice? Why do you teach?

    I practice because it calls me. I love the practice. I don’t have particular goals, I just really love being in silence with my breath and body, observing how I calibrate and change; understanding the microcosm gives me some insight into the macrocosm.  I teach because I love it. I teach from where I practice. Practice has taught me self-referral, self reliance, self respect. All of these can be cultivated, refined, and practiced daily.

    What’s your favorite yoga quote or mantra?

    My favorite yoga quote is from the Yoga Sutras 1:14.  In order for your practice to be grounded and of the earth, it must be done consistently, for a long period of time, with devotion.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I like anything by Dharma Mittra, Mooji, Jack Kornfield, Anodea Judith, Caroline Myss, Tara Brach.

    What is your dharma, your life mission?

    To live and share in the experience of realizing who we are in whatever form it takes- for me it’s in the form of practice and teaching. Living and sharing the process of realization via the practice through teaching.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Enjoy it. Learn as much as you can. Trust yourself. Be receptive.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I have developed my own school, Roots Love Yoga, as a way to share more deeply with students. I offer 200 Hour Yoga Teacher Training, 300 Hour Yoga Teacher Training, Yoga Workshops, Retreats, Classes, Online Coaching and Mentorships.

    Aside from your fantastic course on Omstars, do you have a favorite class that you’d like to share?

    I like all of the Yin classes by Anamargret Sanchez.

    By Marie Belle Perez Rivera

    Practice with Marie Belle on Omstars

    I am grounded in a daily Mysore and Dharma yoga practice. I also love and train hand balancing, rock climbing, and dance; all of it is intuitive movement. It’s all love. I am happy to offer yoga classes, movement retreats, workshops, and intensives in the United States, Bali, Costa Rica, Mexico, India, Europe, and the Caribbean. My life calling and practice has led me to travel the world and immerse myself fully in yoga and meditation through villages in India, Indonesia, Portugal, the crisp blue Caribbean waters, and the heart of Miami Beach. With extensive training as a Psychologist in Social Emotional Development (Ph.D.), Women’s Studies (Graduate Certificate), Reiki, Magnified Healing, and Oneness Awakening, my classes utilize a keen awareness of the intellectual, emotional, and energetic body to empower those who practice consistently, for a long period of time, with devotion. I offer universal intimacy, full of love, honor, and a sweet mix of playfulness, integrity, and discipline. To connect with me, make sure to follow my ongoing journeys via Instagram and Facebook.

  • Interview with Adrian Molina

    I made my practice, piece-by-piece, learning here and there. The most effective practice is the one that is the most effective to the students that you have in front of you and makes them feel alive while safe and nurtured.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Stubborn – Kind – Dedicated

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from Buenos Aires, Argentina and I live in Miami Beach

    How long have you been practicing yoga and why did you start practicing yoga?

    I’ve been practicing since 2004 and I started practicing because the practice appeared at a time in life where I was ready.

    What is yoga to you?

    A way of connecting with the world, and through the world to myself.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you want students to feel after they practice with you?

    I want them to feel exactly the same way I felt. Like if I was sent into a rocket to the moon and came back and I had the trip of my life.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    Before I was a collection of thoughts, there was no integration, no perspective. Now there are thoughts, perspective, but there is also an internal base. A more calming perspective.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what makes a good yoga teacher?

    I didn’t. The practice took me that path even when I resisted it. It was meant to be.

    Practice with Adrian LIVE on Omstars

    What style of yoga do you practice and what makes that style most effective? Do you have a teacher in your style of yoga?

    I don’t believe in styles. I don’t believe in gurus. I never had a yoga guru. I made my practice, piece-by-piece, learning here and there. The most effective practice is the one that is the most effective to the students that you have in front of you and makes them feel alive while safe and nurtured.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice? 

    Achieve a level of recognition that continuously pulls my ego into believing that this is all about and continuing the process of humbling myself for the small things.

    What is yoga favorite yoga pose and why? And what’s your least favorite yoga pose and why?

    I don’t have favorite poses. I enjoy movement. Life is movement. Postures can be ecstatic. I enjoyed transitions more than postures.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Crying on the mat. And understanding that I was on the mat for solace and not for fitness.

    And how about as a teacher?

    The continuous love that inspires me to keep learning, giving, and living.

    Why do you practice? Why do you teach?

    I practice for health. I teach for love.

    What’s your favorite yoga quote or mantra?

    “Relax, nothing is under control.” –Pema Chodron.

    Get started with Adrian’s Warrior Flow classes on Omstars

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    Condensing everything into an Instagram post with a quote that have no connection to each other.

    What’s the most embarrassing thing that has ever happened to you as a student and as a teacher?

    You don’t want to know!

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    Autobiography of a Yogi by Yogananda

    What is your dharma, your life mission?

    Discovering my dharma and my life mission

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Listen to yourself, lots of people talk, very few of them do.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    So many: teaching at prisons, hospitals, schools, community events.

    Aside from your fantastic course on Omstars, do you have a favorite class that you’d like to share?

    My husband, Dennis Hunter’s, courses and classes.

    By Adrian Molina

    Read more articles by Adrian Molina

    Adrian Molina is the founder of Warrior Flow. With over 15,000 hours of classroom teaching experience, Adrian is renowned for the sophistication and depth of his teaching style and the degree of mindfulness, compassion and precision he brings to asana practice. He is also a writer, massage therapist, Thai Yoga Bodywork practitioner, Reiki master, and a Kriya Yoga meditation practitioner in the lineage of Paramahansa Yogananda.

  • Interview with Erica Mather

    Yoga changed EVERYTHING. I was looking for answers through thinking my way through every challenge. Yoga connected me to my body, spirit, and beyond, and has supplied frameworks for understanding life that don’t involve just the intellect. I think I’m much more aware now, and more integrated with all aspects of myself.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Intense, Warm, Grounding

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I’m “from” Madison, Wisconsin, but New York City really raised me. This is where I live.

    How long have you been practicing yoga and why did you start practicing yoga?

    I’ve been practicing yoga for 16 years. I began because I was looking for solutions for my adult-onset migraine headaches.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is an opportunity and a way to get to know ourselves. Once we know ourselves better, then we begin to have a different relationship with the people and the world around us.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you want students to feel after they practice with you?

    I felt connected to my Self–her pain, and hopefulness–in ways I didn’t know were possible. I want my students to feel safe in themselves, and at home in their bodies. When people feel safe in their bodies, they have a high chance of showing up fully and authentically as themselves.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    Yoga changed EVERYTHING. I was looking for answers through thinking my way through every challenge. Yoga connected me to my body, spirit, and beyond, and has supplied frameworks for understanding life that don’t involve just the intellect. I think I’m much more aware now, and more integrated with all aspects of myself.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what makes a good yoga teacher?

    I decided to teach because, honestly, I didn’t have a better plan! What makes me a good teacher is my capacity to quickly assess people’s physical abilities and to work with them where they are at. Whether in a class, or 1-2-1, I’m swift in this regard, and as a result my students feel seen and are able to grow in ways that might not otherwise be available to them.

    What style of yoga do you practice and what makes that style most effective? Do you have a teacher in your style of yoga?

    I’m a Forrest Yoga Guardian (lineage-holder), and I teach this practice as well as a hybrid Forrest/Vinyasa blend. I find Forrest Yoga to be a very effective style for beginners, injured people, as well as advanced practitioners. It’s effective because it teaches people to feel the truth of their bodies, as they are now, and the postures are emergent from that reality. Ana Forrest is my teacher.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice? 

    Like any relationship, my relationship with yoga has its ebbs and flows. After so many years, sometimes we think it’s “over.” The biggest struggle has been to “stay in it.” Meaning, stay in the relationship. To keep the faith. To look for new depths. To ride out the periods of dissatisfaction and communicate in good faith. To return again and again. My biggest milestone has been healing my back from an injury I sustained in high school: spondylosis and spondylolisthesis. Without my yoga practice, I’m certain this injury would have gone from bad to worse. With my yoga practice, and over more than a decade of work, it’s gone from bad to stable.

    What is yoga favorite yoga pose and why? And what’s your least favorite yoga pose and why?

    My favorite pose is the pose I’m in at the moment. My least favorite pose is the pose I’m in at the moment that offers me great resistance.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Honestly, almost every moment with my teacher, Ana Forrest, is an inspirational one!

    And how about as a teacher?

    I think seeing my students become great teachers in their own right is an inspirational moment that happens again, and again.

    Practice with Erica Mather on Omstars

    Why do you practice? Why do you teach?

    I practice to keep my finger on the pulse of the evolving being that is me. Yoga encompasses the WHOLE human, including the body, and for me is an effective discipline for staying in touch with myself. I teach because I LOVE to teach. It is my original skill, the one I was set on this planet to use.

    What’s your favorite yoga quote or mantra?

    The success of yoga does not lie in the ability to perform postures but in how it positively changes the way we live our life and our relationships. ~T.V.K.Desikachar

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    I don’t know! I’m not sure what’s happening in Africa, or South Asia! I feel like I can only speak to what’s occurring in North America…

    What’s the most embarrassing thing that has ever happened to you as a student and as a teacher?

    Clothing malfunctions always rank high…

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I think everyone ought to read The Heart of Yoga by T.K.V.Desikachar. I also recommend my teacher’s book, Fierce Medicine, by Ana Forrest.

    What is your dharma, your life mission?

    To help people feel good in, and about their bodies. When people have compassion for their own tender, animal selves, it has a ripple effect into the world, increasing compassion exponentially. It touches the people around us, the four-legged ones, the winged ones, the finned ones, the trees and EVERYTHING. I think it is very hard to find compassion in our lives when we are cruel or violent to our own physical manifestations. I have written a book on this subject, specifically to help women improve their relationships with their bodies. It will be published April 2020!

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Cultivate curiosity. It is the single most powerful tool you can take with you into any interaction, with yourself, and with other people.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    YES! My book! Coming soon! It’s the culmination of so much of what I’m talking about here. The title is F*ck Your Beauty Standards: Stop Wasting Time Hating Your Body and Start Living Your Life. It will be published in April 2020 (New Harbinger).

    Aside from your fantastic course on Omstars, do you have a favorite class that you’d like to share?

    I recommend also checking out Dianne Bondy’s work. She is forging ahead tirelessly, working to make yoga accessible to all people.

    By Erica Mather

  • Interview with Ahmed Soliman

     

    I practice because yoga has become part of who I am – physically, spiritually, emotionally. I could no more easily stop being a yogi than I could stop having curly hair. I teach because it is a privilege to share this practice to others.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Passionate, inquisitive, and loyal.

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from Egypt and came to live in Brooklyn after sixteen years in California. All three places have been deeply influential.

    How long have you been practicing yoga and why did you start practicing yoga?

    I have been practicing yoga for almost 10 years and came to the practice after a serious car accident and multiple resulting knee surgeries sidelined me from my lifelong passion for contact sports and, particularly, soccer. I was drawn to the safe, sustainable practice of yoga as a means to repair my body, nourish my soul, and develop a practice that I could continue over the course of my lifetime. This experience has deeply informed my teaching style — I teach with a goal that each student practice with the precise, proper alignment that will prevent injury and ensure longevity of practice.

    What is yoga to you?

    As a practicing Muslim, I have been taught to always seek balance. Yoga is a practice and lifestyle that allows me to deepen my connection to my faith and find balance through challenging times.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you want students to feel after they practice with you?

    After my first class, I remember walking up to the teacher and asking, “Can I do this everyday?” I hope my students feel that too.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    Yoga has given me the gift of integrating a deeply personal practice with a tremendously satisfying profession. While on the outside, my prior career as a wildlife biologist (I worked in the recovery of endangered species) may seem entirely different, in fact the drive to serve a greater good underlies my entire career trajectory. My own yoga practice gave me grounding, balance, and sustainability. The fact that I am able to have a career of bringing yoga and helping others in my community to find balance brings me more professional satisfaction than I ever dared to imagine I’d find.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what makes a good yoga teacher?

    I started teaching yoga because I wanted to teach in a way that encourages inclusivity. With proper alignment and technique, absolutely anyone can practice yoga. Delivering that message is what makes a good yoga teacher.

    What style of yoga do you practice and what makes that style most effective? Do you have a teacher in your style of yoga?

    I practice Vinyasa and Iyengar yoga styles. Iyengar allows yoga to be available for all, through mindful and proper alignment.  Incorporating that knowledge into Vinyasa helps me shape an accessible flow.

    What is yoga favorite yoga pose and why? And what’s your least favorite yoga pose and why?

    My favorite yoga pose is downward facing dog. It is strengthening but calming and foundational to the practice. My least favorite is Kurmasana, tortoise pose

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Learning that, with patience, awareness and practice, challenging asanas that I thought were impossible for me become possible and how I can apply that to other challenges in my life

    And how about as a teacher?

    After a few years practicing together, one of my private clients called me from his doctor’s office to tell me he had grown almost half an inch! I was so happy that our stretching, lengthening, and upright- shape enhancing movements gave him a tangible benefit.

    Join Ahmed’s LIVE classes on Omstars

    Why do you practice? Why do you teach?

    I practice because yoga has become part of who I am – physically, spiritually, emotionally. I could no more easily stop being a yogi than I could stop having curly hair. I teach because it is a privilege to share this practice to others.

    What’s your favorite yoga quote or mantra?

    When I teach, I often say “as you are.” I typically say it when I ask my students to maintain the shape they have made, but to add on to it. A student who practices with me regularly told me that every time I said this, she almost cries. And I realized that “as you are” is really representative of the practice of yoga and even life, more generally. “As you are,” whatever you bring to this day, on or off the mat, that is just fine. Exactly who you are right now is exactly who you are supposed to be. When it comes to yoga, we are working with who we are at that moment. Not what we once were or what we will be.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    I am a big believer in yoga as an inclusive practice and community. I hope that we continue to find ways to show people that you don’t have to look a certain way or believe in a certain thing to be a yogi. Yoga is for everybody.

    What’s the most embarrassing thing that has ever happened to you as a student and as a teacher?

    I am either so fortunate or so forgetful that I cannot think of an embarrassing yoga experience!

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    Light on Life and Light on Yoga, both by B.K.S. Iyengar, are exceptional. Thoughtful, thought- provoking, and informative.

    What is your dharma, your life mission?

    I am constantly seeking balance and sustainability. Be it through my pre-yoga career as a wildlife biologist, my political activism, or my community outreach.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    I teach yoga with exacting precision for alignment. I encourage a beginner to seek to practice with precision, but to be forgiving throughout the journey. Like an archer who directs the arrow and lets it go must accept the path the arrow takes, so too must a yogi seek precision, but accept the unexpected directions. So start on your path, direct, redirect, and let go.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I am most excited about my upcoming retreat in Costa Rica! As a former wildlife biologist, I am excited to lead my students through yoga in a bio-diverse paradise where we will explore nature, hike, identify rare species, bird watch and, of course, practice yoga.

    Aside from your fantastic course on Omstars, do you have a favorite class that you’d like to share?

    I have lots of exciting things going on! It’s all on my website, yogisoli.com. And my weekly, online live class on Plankk Studio App and Omstars.com is Mondays 8:00-9:00 a.m. Eastern Time.

    Get started with Ahmed’s Mindful Alignment course on Omstars

     

    By Ahmed Soliman