• All Squashed Up

     

    Here are some simple ways to make two types of squash, two ways.  The varieties of squash for this dish include Acorn and Butternut.

    Ingredients

    • Butternut Squash
    • Acorn Squash
    • Coconut Oil
    • Rosemary Leaf
    • Sprouted Quinoa
    • Avocado
    • Alfalfa Sprouts
    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    • Basil
    • Garlic
    • Pink Himalayan Salt
    • Black Pepper

    Directions

    Sprouted Quinoa

    The first part of the recipe began the night before – you may also buy sprouted quinoa.  I like to soak quinoa the night before I cook it. This allows the quinoa to sprout and also deactivate the enzyme inhibitors. Sprouting quinoa can be achieved very easily by placing raw quinoa in a bowl of clean, non-chlorinated water at room temperature, overnight. Once done, the grains will be noticeably softer and make an excellent addition to salads or other cold meals. You can put it in a cheese cloth or a nut milk bag to drain the water and leave it in the sunlight for a day to allow the quinoa to sprout even more.  If you wish to let the sprouts go wild, this process can be repeated for several days.  Just remember to rinse the quinoa twice per day and leave in the cheesecloth or nut milk bag.

    The science behind the sprouting process and its effect on the seed and the human digestive system is fascinating.  Humans do not have the digestive enzymes necessary to break down the fibers contained in grains, nuts, seeds and legumes. Through the sprouting process, gases are released which activate the natural enzymes and release the nutrients, making them available and easier for human digestion. Germinated seeds are easier to digest and the large intestine does not need to produce bacteria to break down the fiber, avoiding the fermentation process which turns the large intestine acid, when it should be alkaline.

    All grains and seeds contain enzyme inhibitors that interfere with the absorption of proteins, cause gastric distress, and deficiencies in amino acids. They also contain phytates (phytic acid) which block the intestinal absorption of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, copper and zinc which are necessary for strong bones, teeth and for overall health.

    The sprouting process allows enzymes, lactobacilli and other helpful organisms neutralize phytic acid, remove enzyme inhibitors and break down complex starches.

    The quinoa will cook quickly since it has been sprouted overnight.  Add a little bit of coconut oil to a pan with rosemary.  Let the rosemary slowly cook in the oil.  Once it appears to be lightly browning, add in chopped garlic and let cook for 3 mins in the coconut oil. Add the sprouted quinoa and just enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, the quinoa should not be covered. Heat is still medium. Keep stirring throughout and add in chopped basil, pink Himalayan salt and black pepper.  Fluff to finish.

    Butternut Squash

    Next step in the recipe is to cut the tips off the butternut squash, chop in half the long way, then remove seeds. Take the skin off, easiest with a peeler. Chop into small cubes and place into a large pan.   Add a small amount of Coconut oil to the pan.  Next, add in rosemary leaf and cook on medium for 10 mins, stirring every couple of minutes.  Once the squash is close to being done, or soft,  toss in chopped garlic.  The garlic will cook in 5 mins or less at medium heat, which will allow the flavor to be released into the squash without overcooking it.

    Acorn Squash

    While the butternut squash is cooking, preheat the oven to 350.  Chop the tips off the acorn squash, just enough so that it sits flat on a baking tray.  Halve the acorn squash and clean out the seeds.  Add a small amount of coconut oil to each half.   Put the Squash in the oven for approx. 20 – 30 mins.  If you like, finish them off in the broiler to brown the tops.

    Wilted Kale

    Add chopped purple kale to another pan and put on light heat to wilt. Lightly salt and pepper.

    Plating

    Butternut Squash

    To plate the butternut squash dish, you can achieve a simple and beautiful layering effect by using a small bowl.  Start with the butternut squash on the bottom.  Next put the kale, followed by the quinoa.  Press the quinoa down so that all the ingredients are pressed tightly into the bowl.  Cover the bowl with a plate and flip upside down, give it a few taps on the bottom of the bowl to release and remove.  Garnish with avocado and sprouts.  Finish off with light salt, pepper and extra virgin olive oil.

    Acorn Squash

    Once the acorn squash is done, remove from oven and fill with the cooked quinoa.  Top with sliced avocado and add light salt and pepper.  Finish with a light drizzle of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    Vallaha, there you have it, all squashed up.  Buen Provecho.

    Health Benefits

    Butternut Squash

    When shopping for butternut squash (technically a fruit), look for a matte color on the skin.  A squash with a shiny skin indicates that it was picked to early.  No need to refrigerate the squash, just place in a well-ventilated area and it will keep for up to 3 months.  Up to a week if cut up and covered in the fridge

    The most notable befits of butternut squash are in it’s color. The color signals an abundance of powerhouse nutrients known as carotenoids, shown to protect against heart disease. In particular, the gourd boasts very high levels of beta-carotene (which your body converts to vitamin A) and one cup of butternut squash contains 50% of the recommended daily dose of antioxidant rich vitamin C.

    And in case you aren’t already sold, butternut squash has been shown to be a very powerful anti-inflammatory, making this fruit great for athletes as well as people suffering from disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and asthma.

    Acorn Squash

    Acorn squash contains vitamin A, niacin, folate, thiamine and vitamin B-6, but it is an especially good source of vitamin C. One half cup of cooked acorn squash provides about 20 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C. Adequate vitamin C promotes the health of the immune and skeletal systems and may help prevent hypertension, heart disease, cancer and osteoarthritis. The vitamin C content of foods is degraded by exposure to air, light, heat and water. To maximize the amount of vitamin C you receive from acorn squash, use the fruit three to four days after purchase and cut immediately before cooking. Steam or bake the squash instead of boiling it to keep vitamin C from being lost in the cooking water.

    Each half-cup serving of acorn squash contains 13 percent of the recommended daily intake of potassium and 11 percent of that for magnesium. As both a mineral and an electrolyte, potassium plays a vital role in muscle contraction and in maintaining the body’s water balance. Magnesium regulates potassium levels, strengthens bones and teeth, and aids in proper energy metabolism. Regularly eating potassium- and magnesium-rich foods like acorn squash, can lessen your chance of stroke, osteoporosis, depression and diabetes. Acorn squash also contains small amounts of iron, calcium, zinc and phosphorus.

    By Adam Kenworthy

    Adam’s passion and appreciation for cooking arose from his love for extreme sports. Having participated in many tests of physical and mental endurance he quickly realized the impact a healthy and well balanced diet played on his overall performance. Adam began to study various aspects of plant based diets, holistic remedies, and culinary techniques from around the world. Through the use of organic, farm-to-table ingredients, Adam hopes to inspire many to reconsider their current eating habits and direct them toward a more sustainable lifestyle.  He believes that conscious eating is the key to living a more healthy and vibrant co-existence with Mother Nature.

     

    Learn More from Adam on Omstars

     

  • The Best Paleo Granola Bars

     

    Whether you call them granola or muesli bars – these are vegan, free from refined sugar and grains. This makes them also a gluten free granola bar. In truth, it’s a nut bar. So delicious. Paleo Granola Bar recipe below.

    The perfect pocket sized snack or lunch box treats. I’ve made these a number of times and I like them best when they are crunchy. So cook them low and slow. Additionally I like to cut them smaller as they are quite filling. Why bother with Paleo if you are vegan? Well, quite simply, it’s possible to be an unhealthy vegan if you fill your diet with wheat and flour based foods. Anytime you can swap the wheat out for something more nutritionally dense, you are doing yourself a favor. I don’t want to bang on about wheat flour here, (as so many experts have already written much about the topic), just make this and eat it because it’s delicious! You have the added benefit of knowing it is healthier than the regular shop bought muesli bars laden with sugar.

    Hemp seed powder

    These crunchy paleo granola bars have the addition of hemp powder. This gives them an extra protein boost. If you don’t have hemp powder you could swap for oats or leave it out completely. You could also leave out the tahini, but I include it because it is an excellent source of calcium.

    NOTE: What is just as important as putting nutritious food into your body? Having your body be able to extract and absorb the nutrients. For this reason I recommend soaking the nuts first and then drying them in a dehydrator. This will remove the inhibitor enzymes and make them easier to digest. Of course, like you, I sometimes can’t be bothered with all that and have still made this successfully without soaking the nuts first. Both work. But if you have the time, soak overnight then rinse and dry out in the dehydrator or oven on a low temp. Below 47 Degrees Celsius. Drizzle granola bar with chocolate. Make your own or use shop bought vegan dark chocolate.

    Ingredients

    • 3 1/2 cups of mixed raw nuts
    • 1/2 cup pepitas and sunflower seeds
    • 1 cup dried fruit (I used a mix of apricots, sultanas and currants)
    • 1/2 cup desiccated coconut
    • 1/3 cup coconut oil
    • 1/3 cup rice malt syrup
    • 1/2 cup almond butter
    • 1 tbs tahini
    • 2 tbs hemp powder
    • 3 tsp Maldon sea salt flakes
    • 1 tbs pure vanilla essence or extract

    Method

    On a low heat, melt the oil, tahini, nut butter, rice malt syrup, salt, and vanilla. Mix well in the saucepan until combined. Add in vanilla and cinnamon. In a food processor, blend half the nuts, all the hemp powder and all of the desiccated coconut until fine crumb. Roughly pulse in the remaining nuts and seeds so still chunky. Mix in fruit. Combine wet ingredients with dry. Mix well. Press into a lamination tray lined with baking paper. Bake in a low oven (160 degrees Celsius) for about 30 minutes. Be careful not to burn the nuts bars. When golden toasted, pull out bars and cut into slices while still warm. Allow to cool and top with melted dark chocolate. Store in fridge. Store in an airtight container.

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Natalie Prigoone is the author of ‘The Great Uncooking’ a raw food detox book and A Piece of Cake: Easy Raw Desserts. She is a yoga teacher, high school teacher and raw food chef. Natalie discovered raw foods and their healing magic in 2011. She is passionate about healthy life hacks, and creating recipes that lead to greater health and healing. Follow her on Instagram @thegreatuncooking or Facebook.

    Try more of Natalie’s recipes on Omstars

     

  • Vegan Chocolate Chip Cake with Minty Tofu Icing

    This minty treasure is an absolute delight when paired with a cup of coffee, and desserts are always best when shared with a friend.

    Some of the best recipes are the ones you can whip up in a hurry before a party or last-minute get together. File this away with your easy, vegan recipes for sure.  There is no going back after you discover how simple this delicious dessert is to make. Chocolate chip cake sounds like enough, but the minty tofu icing gives this treat a light, fresh finish.

    Ingredients

    Cake

    • 3 Cups Oat Flour
    • ½ Cup Coconut Sugar
    • ½ Cup Cocoa
    • 1 ½ Teaspoon Baking Powder
    • ¼ Teaspoon Salt
    • ¼ Cup Chocolate Chips or Cacao Nibs
    • 1 Cup Water
    • 1 Squirt Lime Juice
    • 1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract
    • ¼ Cup Coconut Oil or Vegan Butter, Softened

    Frosting

    • 1 Cup Silken tofu, pressed
    • ¼ Cup Powdered Sugar
    • ½ Teaspoon Mint Extract
    • Natural Green Food Coloring (if desired)

    Directions

    Mix dry ingredients first.  Add in wet ingredients. Mix well with whisk or electric mixer. If batter is too thick, add 1 tablespoon of water until you reach the desired consistency. Line 9” X 9” pan with olive oil (or your choice oil).  Pour in cake batter. Bake at 375 degrees for approximately 25 minutes. To make the frosting, place the pressed silken tofu into a bowl with powdered sugar, mint extract, and coloring if desired. Blend together with a whisk or electric mixer until smooth. Depending on the water of the tofu, you may need to add more powdered sugar, or oat flour, to achieve the desired consistency. Once the cake is done, allow to cool, and top with icing.

    Enjoy!

    By Jodi Lane

     

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  • Yogi Super Soup

    A meal that will keep you warm on those chilly spring days, boost your immunity with a hearty dose of super greens, and free up time in your beautiful life.

    This delicious soup is designed for those of us who enjoy healthy food, but don’t have a lot of time to spend in the kitchen. Enjoy a helping of this soup with a spoonful of sunflower seed butter for extra taste and nutrition.  Yoga teaches us to embrace the time we’re given, making this soup the perfect match for the dedicated yogi.

    Ingredients

    • 8 Cups Greens Mixture (Baby Kale, Chard, and Spinach)
    • ½ Sweet Onion – Diced
    • 2 Tomatoes – Diced
    • 1 Leek
    • 32-Oz. Vegetable Broth
    • 1 Tsp Minced Garlic
    • Salt to taste
    • Pepper to taste
    • 1 tsp Rosemary
    • 1 tsp Thyme

    Method

    • Process greens, onions, and tomatoes in food processor making them easier to digest.
    • Cut leek into coins.
    • Place soup pot on medium heat, adding in vegetable broth.
    • Add in all ingredients.
    • Bring soup to boil for 5-10 minutes, stirring regularly.
    • Reduce heat, and allow soup to simmer for approximately 30 minutes.
    • Allow soup 5 minutes to cool before consuming.
    • This recipe yields approximately 5-8 servings.

    Enjoy the comfort good food can bring. Namaste.

    By Jodi Lane

     

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  • Iced Coffee + Chai Protein Smoothie

    New recipe for when you’re in a hurry and need something quick to eat and easy to digest! When you’re life is busy, this might be the case more often than not. Fortunately, Natalie Prigoone has a quick fix for us. It’s and Iced Coffee plus Chai protein smoothie.

    Natalie gets her protein powders from @botanikablends and they come highly recommended.  Protein Powder is like a healthy alternative to fast food and it keeps you full without all the added non-sense. Give this a try:

    Ingredients

    1 cup organic soy milk with ice

    a handful of cashews

    2 medjool dates

    1 ripe, frozen banana

    Cinnamon to taste

    Chai spice drops to taste

    1 scoop of protein powder.

     

    Method:

    Blend 1 cup organic soy milk with ice, a handful of cashews, 2 medjool dates, 1 ripe frozen banana, cinnamon, chai spice drops and your choice of protein powder. The protein powder Natalie used for this recipe was coffee flavored. Give your ingredients a whiz in the blender and when you’re done, you’ll basically have a balanced meal.

    Enjoy

    By Natalie Prigoone

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  • Chocolate and Raspberry Smoothie Bowl

    The smoothie bowl craze that’s been blending its way into society over the last few years ins’t over yet, and we are so excited to share this raw, plant-based treat with you. Did you know that the best time of day to eat chocolate is actually in the morning? And Lee Holmes is helping us capitalize on this delicious knowledge by sharing her recipe for a Chocolate and Raspberry Smoothie Bowl that will have your taste buds singing all morning long.

    This recipe makes 2 servings, but if you don’t have someone to share it with, don’t worry! You can actually make this smoothie in advance and freeze it in a muffin tray. When you’re ready to enjoy, take three out, whiz them in your high-speed blender and you’ll be good to go!

    Side note, wouldn’t this be the perfect treat to share with your someone special this valentines day? We think so!

    Ingredients:

    2 frozen bananas
    1 ripe avocado, peeled
    125 g (41/2 oz/1 cup) raspberries

    2 tablespoons raw cacao powder
    1 teaspoon vanilla powder

    130 g (41/2 oz/1/2 cup)r coconut yoghurt

    125 ml (4 fl oz/1/2 cup) almond milk or plant milk of your choice

    The method for putting this bowl together is simple. Blend together all of your ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy. The mixture should have a spoonable consistency.

    Then, pour the mixture into two bowls and decorate with your chosen topping(s).

    Choose your favorite toppings to put the finishing touches on your smoothie bowl, or use any of the following items recommended by Lee:
    edible flowers, passion fruit, lilly pilly berries, banana, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, almonds, pepitas (pumpkin seeds), chia seeds, coconut flakes, cacao nibs, granola and/or nut butter.

    Enjoy!

    Recipe by Lee Holmes

    Followe Lee on instagram @leesupercharged or check out her website superchargedfoods.com

    Lee Holmes, Gut Friendly Food Expert, Super charged foods, recipes, OMstars

     

  • Sexy Salads ™️  Featuring Red Vein Sorrel

    Adam Kenworthy may be one of the most creative salad creators we know! Each of his salads is unique, colorful and full of flavor. Today, we’re sharing his recipe for a Red Vein Sorrel with shaved and roasted Purple Cauliflower, tossed in lemon juice. This salad is topped of with pan roasted Butternut Squash, watermelon radish, avocado and a sensational Carrot Ginger Dressing.

    Ingredients for the Salad:

    • Red Vein Sorrel
    • Purple Cauliflower
    • 1 Lemon
    • 1 small butternut squash
    •  Watermelon radishes
    • Avocados

    Directions:

    First, cut a large piece of purple cauliflower from the stock, then slice it thinly using a mandoline. Place your cauliflower sliced into a bowl with lemon juice and set that aside.

    Cut the butternut squash in half removing the longer, thinner part of the squash from the shorter, rounder portion of the vegetable. store the thinner portion of the squash to use for another recipe like Adam’s Plant Based Pizza.

    Peel the rounded portion of the butternut squash before cutting it in half and removing the seeds.

    Next, cut the squash into thin slices using a mandoline.

    Roast your squash in a pan with a drizzle of olive oil, over medium heat, until lightly browned.

    Next, use a grater to grate your watermelon radish (desired amount).

    Place your Red Vein Sorrel on a plate, then add the cauliflower, roasted squash, watermelon radish shavings, and avocado. Top it all of with the Carrot Ginger Dressing and enjoy.

    Ingredients for the dressing:

    • 1 small piece of ginger
    • 1 cup grated carrot
    • 4 tbs olive oil
    • 3 tbs coconut vinegar
    • 1 tbs Tamari
    • Pinch of salt
    • Water to help reach desired consistency

    BLEND WELL

    Recipe by Adam Kenworthy

    Follow Adam on Instagram (@adamkenworthy) where he’s constantly posting new and exciting dishes, drinks and snacks and check out his facebook page for some more long form recipes. Plus, check out some of his amazing recipes on Omstars!

    Start Cooking With Adam Kenworthy on Omstars

  • Sweet Potato Rosti

    These are ridiculously easy, two ingredients and sweetly delicious.  Team them with a burger, eggs or anywhere where you might be tempted by bread.  Just be careful not top burn them as the sugar content in the vegetable does tend to brown quickly.  Usea medium temperature and finish them off on the oven.

    Ingredients

    Sweet potato

    Olive oil or coconut oil

    Himalyan salt

    Method

    Wash and peel sweet potato. Use a julienne peeler or mandoline to peel long thin strips of the vegetable.  If you have neither of these tools then just use a regular grater.  I like the julienne peeler because it’s quick with an easy wash up and results in really long this strips which are easy to swirl around the fork.

    Drizzle on oil and mix with a fork so that strands are coated.  Swirl with a fork as you would long spaghetti to get a round ball.  Place in a shallow pan with hot oil and fry for a few minutes until golden.  Crackle on some pink salt. Shape it into a perfect circle with your spatula and keep an eye on it so it doesn’t burn.  You will find that it also steams while it fries due to the loose structure of the strands.  When the desired colour is reached, place them on a tray in a medium oven until ready to eat.

    Note:  If the edges go a little black, they still taste good. Don’t throw them out.

    Try these with one of my vegan burgers like the beetroot burger

    Enjoy!

    By Natalie Prigoone

  • Roasted Vegetable Stock

    Escoffier claimed “Indeed, stock is everything in cooking. Without it, nothing can be done.” A staple and medicinal cure-all in traditional households and the prime ingredient in classic gourmet cuisine, stock or broth made from meat or vegetables is a beautiful meal-base ingredient to always have on hand in the freezer, and has been revered for generations for its ability to nurture the sick and nourish families.

    For chefs, stock is the charmed elixir for making soul-warming soups and spectacular sauces.

    Vegetable broths made mindfully at home are one of the cheapest and easiest ways to use up leftover veggies, making it a fabulously frugal and environmentally friendly household staple.

    If you’re looking to be a more conscious consumer, a homemade stock using up all of your on-hand veggies are the perfect way to enter into the world of frugality, and can help you to justify spending a little extra on quality organic ingredients as you find use for every last skerrick of produce to create delicious meals for you and your family to enjoy.

    Beyond adding delicious flavour as the bases of sauces, stocks, soups and stews, they also act as a supercharged “tonic” that are wonderful for adding a dose of healing nutrients that are empowering for health.

    Many of the minerals and vital nutrients contained within vegetables are actually bound up within the cell walls of the raw product. Long, slow and gentle cooking actually allows for the breakdown of the cell walls of veggies so that your digestive system can have easy access to the uptake of nutrients.

    This is an especially helpful process if you suffer from leaky gut or malabsorption.  Adding broths and stocks is an extra insurance policy to ensure that your body is being flooded with easy-to-digest nutrients and it’s one of the staples in my book Heal Your Gut and Heal Your Gut online programs.

    I love to experiment with different flavours of seasonal vegetables, herbs and scrap leftovers to create nourishing stocks and tasty, nutrient-rich broths that are both delicious and healing.

    When making the shift from store bought, additive laden stock cubes and carton-housed broths to homemade nourishing creations, be sure to purchase chemical free and organically grown vegetables wherever possible as these will yield the highest quality of nutrients and remove the possibility of leeching harmful pesticides into your broth that are harmful to your precious microbiome.

    Whilst you can create amazing veggie stocks simply by throwing in any on-hand veggie scraps such as celery leaves, carrots, onions, garlic, herbs, spices and other garden dwellers, this particular stock is my favourite.  I consider it my ‘Best Ever’ roasted vegetable stock.

    Taking a little extra time to roast the veg will boost the flavour tenfold and injects a sweet and savoury flavour that is the key foundation for an array of scrumptious soups, casseroles and slow cooking.  It adds beautifully to delicate summer soups and hearty winter bowls.

    Proportions don’t need to be to the lettuce, oops letter – just throw in what you have and create a melting pot of goodness. Use top-quality veg and be bold with healing seasonings.

    I hope you enjoy my best ever roasted vegetable stock.

    Makes 1-.125 litres (4-5 cups)

    Ingredients

    • 2 large onions, skin on, quartered or thickly sliced
    • 2 parsnips, rinsed and roughly chopped
    • 2 celery stalks, roughly chopped
    • 1 leek, roughly chopped
    • 3 garlic cloves, skin on
    • 1 red capsicum (pepper), quartered and seeds removed
    • 2 Roma (plum) tomatoes, halved
    • extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling
    • 55 g (2 oz/1 small bunch) flat-leaf (Italian) parsley
    • 4–5 thyme sprigs
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
    • 80 ml (2 1/2 fl oz / 1/3 cup) apple cider vinegar
    • filtered water, to cover

    Method:

    1. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F).
    2. Put all the vegetables in a roasting pan and splash with the olive oil, tossing to coat.
    3. Roast for 45 minutes, stirring often. You may have to remove the vegetables that cook faster as they are ready. Once all the vegetables are cooked, transfer them to a large stockpot or flameproof casserole dish over medium heat on the stovetop. A slow cooker can also be used.  Add the herbs, peppercorns and apple cider vinegar, then add filtered water to cover and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 1 hour. Topping up with water if required.
    4. Strain through a cheesecloth-lined sieve, store in an airtight container in the fridge and use as needed.

    Enjoy!

    By Lee Holmes

    Follower her on instagram @leesupercharged 

    Check out Lee’s website superchargedfoods.com

    Lee Holmes, Gut Friendly Food Expert, Super charged foods, recipes, OMstars

  • Cozy Potato Leek Soup

    When it gets cold outside as winter finally makes its way down to Florida, all I want to do is eat soup. Largely, this is because eating soup is a great way to warm back up after spending time in the season, but that’s not the only reason. If you look at this desire based on Ayurveda, being that my primary Dosha is Vata, this actually makes a lot of sense!

    Vata people thrive in a warm and moist climate (that’s why I love living in Florida so much), but when it starts to get cold outside, it can throw us off balance and have all sorts of negative effects on us physically, mentally and emotionally. So, if you naturally start to crave warm, cooked, moist foods around this time of year, it’s a pretty good sign that your Vata Dosha is well balanced.

    Eating these kinds of foods helps to create that warm moist climate that Vatas love so much, internally. So, when the air becomes cold and dry, embrace your desire to eat more soup, it’s a great way to stay balanced through the fall and winter months. And even if you don’t like to eat soups and stews, if you know you have a lot of Vata in your prakriti or vikriti, then you should probably start.

    So, in light of this beautiful Ayurvedic knowledge, today I’d like to share my recipe for Potato Leek soup. It’s super simple and it really hits the spot! So, gather these ingredients and give it a try!

     

    INGREDIENTS

    5 Russet Potatoes

    1 Leek

    1 Small Sweet Onion

    4 cups of Vegetable Broth

    ½ Cup of Nutritional Yeast Flakes

    Juice of ½ a Lemon

    2 Table Spoons of Coconut Cream (optional)

     

    METHOD

    Set a pot of water to boil, then start peeling your potatoes and cutting them into large chunks.

    Once the water is boiling, add in the potatoes and let them cook until soft.

    Next, cut up your onion and your leek and sauté them together in vegan butter or olive oil.

    Once the potatoes are cooked, drain the water. Then add the leeks and onions to the pot with the potatoes and cover with vegetable broth. Set the burner to low.

    Next, use a handheld immersion blender and blend till smooth.

    Add the yeast flakes and the lemon juice and continue blending until well incorporated.

    You can use the coconut cream if you prefer a creamier soup but be aware that this will sweeten the soup slightly.

    Add salt and pepper to taste, then serve and enjoy

    Feel free to add more or less of each ingredient to make this soup to your liking.

     

    By Alex Wilson

    Alex Wilson is a writer, yoga teacher, Ayurveda Yoga Specialist, and the content manager here at Omstars.com

    Alex Wilson, Anxious yogi

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