• Interview with Emily Cox

    Firey, Silly, Authentic

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from Kansas City Missouri and currently live and work here. However, I would love to move to the beach in the next few years!

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    I was always a very athletic child. I played soccer, basketball, volleyball, the like. I had a full-ride scholarship to college for soccer and decided that I wanted to deviate from the path that was laid out for me, yet felt this yearning for the discipline and structure that I always had from sports. A friend asked me to join her for a hatha yoga class at a local studio. I bounced from studio to studio taking different styles and methods of Yoga until I walked into an Ashtanga class 10 years ago. I was hooked! The discipline, the structure, the rigidity, the spiritually inclined philosophical teachings were everything that I needed at the ripe age of 19. I continue to take classes at that same studio to date and owe so much of my physical, spiritual, and mental growth to this practice.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    Yoga has dramatically shifted my life and my practice has evolved significantly over the years. It creates stability and comfort for me while also providing a strict and disciplined format that I can rely on. The asana practice is like a safe laboratory to explore the often unsafe challenges of the world around us. For this reason, I find everything that I need through the practice.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga to me is a way of exploring the inner self. I feel that our biggest disease in the west is our disconnect with ourselves. Thus, I find that the more I practice, the closer I get to my purest form.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you feel this influences or impacts the space you create for your students?

    After my first Yoga class, I remember feeling things I had never felt before. Places in the body, places in the mind and the space between felt as if a veil had been lifted. For this reason, I tell my students to let go of everything they think they know about the body, the mind, the breath, and the practice as every time we step onto our mat we come with a brand new body, set of intentions, stressors, triggers and truamas. So, it is important to view every class regardless of how seasoned you are as you viewed your first: Knowing nothing and ready to learn about not only the practice, but the self.

    Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved, and transformed?

    I was lucky to have found Yoga at a young age, so my life before consisted primarily of going to school, playing soccer, and contemplating life. However, Yoga has deeply changed me since discovering it. My whole life pivoted in the direction of Yoga. I don’t do Yoga, I am Yoga!

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what qualities do you feel are important to build and work on as a yoga teacher?

    In the beginning, my intention was actually not to teach. I received my certification in hopes to deepen my own practice. When I arrived home, the studio where I practiced had an opening for an Intro to Ashtanga class on Sunday mornings. I agreed to mentor under the teacher who had been teaching the class for several years prior and ultimately took it over after she left and opened her own studio. I feel it is vital to be authentic & provide a modern take on ancient teachings to the best of your ability.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching, and within the yoga community?

    In my practice & teaching my biggest milestone was myself. I am a type-A person, I guess a lot of us Ashtangis are, huh? Thus, the ego and I have a hot and cold relationship. Within the Yoga community, I have found that it is important to remember that everyone is human.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Practicing with Kino is definitely up there! Although, traveling to India to live and breathe Yoga for 5 weeks wasn’t bad either!

    Why do you practice?

    I practice in order to develop a deeper relationship with myself and the world around me, to transcend the limits of the mind, and to tap into something limitless.

    Why do you teach?

    I teach to share the method of Yoga. This practice is so powerful and so healing for the mind, body, and soul…I feel it’s my duty to be a vessel to pass on the knowledge.

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    I feel that saturation is a big issue. Yoga is much like the game of telephone. One person’s Guru told them something which was interpreted by someone else as such and so on and so forth and the next thing you know there is Rage Yoga and Goat Yoga and Beer Yoga and it dilutes the integrity of the method itself.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    I highly recommend educational books like:

    • Light on Yoga
    • The Living Gita
    • The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
    • How Yoga Works
    • The Journey Home

    Also anything Kino writes is gold!

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    I feel that my offering is to share a life of health and happiness with everyone around me. To preach the power of personalized nutrition and to spread the message of Yoga!

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Just keep coming! The first few classes are always the most vulnerable and then you’ll be hooked!

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    I am currently holding a Mentorship Mastermind Program for new and aspiring Yoga instructors. I will be holding 2 per year! Other than that, I am working on some upcoming events, collaborations, teaching experiences, etc. so just stay in the loop on my Instagram, website or newsletter!

    What’s your Favorite Book?

    All time favorite book is WomanCode. Totally changed my life.

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    I am a sucker for ravioli!

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    My Fiance and I make a mean gf vegan lasagna, mac n cheese & Shakshuka. We also love homemade cesar salads with grilled salmon! I am always experimenting for work and recently we have done a lot of soups… vegan potato soup… to die for! Oh and all of the smoothies, juices, protein balls and anything breakfast all of the time!

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    I have a huge garden with chickens that I tend to! I love to be outside in the sun by the water. I like to read, cook, eat, and i’ll admit it…I indulge in reality TV from time to time!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    Kino! She has really built an empire, yet is incredibly humble despite being one of the most well-spoken and well-read FEMALE individuals in her field. She is an expert and has devoted her life to the practice and I commend her!

    Do you have a favorite podcast?

    I love Stuff You Should Know! They are always discussing new and interesting topics, telling crazy stories or recounting historical events. Definitely worth listening to!

    Also MindBodyGreen.

    I also love podcasts on women in business, relationship advice, nutrition and health, science, mindfulness and self-growth

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    Swiss army knife/machete, matches/mirror, sleeping bag (trying to be realistic)

    When you were a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

    I wanted to be a lot of things that kids say they want: A doctor, a lawyer, the like, but I always thought I would be a professional soccer player.

    What’s your favorite movie?

    That’s a hard one… Definitely a Wes Anderson film!

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Well… Since the pandemic, my tv watching norm has shifted. As of late, I have been hooked to 90 Day Fiance… But I also love crime shows, docu-series, and Bobs Burgers!

    Do you have a favorite band/singer?

    Also a hard one! I am really all over the map from Fleetwood Mac to Lauren Hill to Rolling Stones to Linda Rhondstat to Childish Gambino…

    Favorite song to dance to?

    I’ve been listening to Feels Like Summer a lot recently and that has a good shoulder shimmy to it!

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    Set your life on fire. Seek those who fan your flames.

    What is your life’s biggest question?

    I am one of those types of people that just wants to know it all and I am trying to be okay with more observation.

    By Emily Cox

    Emily is a yoga teacher turned holistic healer. She has a passion for getting upside down and being involved in her community. She is a licensed Holistic Nutritionist and Ashtanga Yoga Instructor with more than 10 years of personal practice and 6 years of teaching experience. She started her own wellness business in 2017 where she preaches the power of personalized nutrition to all of her clients! She specializes in gut health and hormone harmony and believes that with the right guidance, tools, and motivation we can all take back the reigns of our health through sustainable yet systematic practices!

    Check out her specialty course on Omstars, Hormone Harmony 101.

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  • Interview with Rozel Gonzales

    Dynamic, Passionate, Open

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am Canadian, born and raised in Montréal, Québec, where we speak English and French. My parents, however, come from the Philippines.

    How did yoga come into your life and what has that journey been like for you?

    Yoga became part of my life when I was a student at McGill University. I had a lot on my plate, trying to stay fit, my studies, and work. I figured if I became a fitness and yoga teacher, it was a way for me to achieve a better balance in my life. In the first 10 years, I taught in the gym environment. I taught power yoga style classes, purely focusing on the physicality of the practice. I would cue my students to breathe in and out, but I actually did not really know how to breathe. As the years progressed, I started to yearn for more. I wanted to be a “real” yoga teacher and so I decided to enroll in a traditional teacher training. I had already started taking these new Ashtanga classes with “this guy” named Mark Darby who started renting out space above the local natural food store close to my home in Montreal. Little did I know at the time that Mark Darby was one of Pattabhi Jois’ original students. Mark and his son Shakara became my teachers for many years, my original teachers. Over the years I continue to learn more, traveling each year to learn from teachers like Manju Jois, Jody Manley, and Kino MacGregor. It has been an amazing journey that I am super passionate about. I love to connect with like-minded people and it is an honor to be able to share with others and learn from my students at the same time.

    How has yoga changed and what do you feel it creates in your daily life?

    The catalyst for change for me was when my firstborn son got sick in 2010. He was 5 years old at the time when he was diagnosed with leukemia. It was such a difficult time for our entire family. Yoga is what kept me sane. The community that I had built around yoga and fitness supported me so much through this time. This year my son celebrates 10 years of remission and we are so grateful. Yoga for me today is a way to help others. I use it as a tool to connect with others and to help them shine. I often say I teach Yoga Off the Mat. My goal is to give you a strong body and mind to help you deal with the journey of life… Sure, I can teach you how to stand on your head, but it’s just the by-product of what I am really trying to do.

    What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is my joy. I feel grounded, strong and open after I practice. My mind feels clear and I enjoy the journey of always learning. Yoga is my friend. It is always there when I need it.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice, in teaching and within the yoga community?

    Covid-19 has been a challenge. As the owner of a health and wellness centre, I have had to adapt by being, flexible, creative and innovative. Fortunately, we have an amazing team and we have been able to remain viable and strong through virtual and hybrid options. We have an amazing community that continues to support us through this challenge and our innovation is helping us to remain leaders in our community.

    Why do you practice?

    I practice because one day… I want to be a wise old woman. In my mind I am calm, content, happily sitting in colorful tights and legwarmers, levitating in padmasana with lots of grandchildren around me.

    Why do you teach?

    I teach because I love it. I love meeting people, connecting and getting to know the stories of my students. My students keep me motivated to keep learning.

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    The Examined Life, Bram Levinson (my friend from Montreal)
    Yoga Mind, Suzan Colon
    The Gift of Imperfection, Brene Brown

    Through your own personal journey, what do you feel is your path and offering to the community- local and global?

    I think I offer an approachable way to learn yoga and Ashtanga in particular. I am strong, but far from perfect. My backbend needs lots of work…and the intermediate series is still very challenging for me… but I think that is a good thing. Imperfection makes you more authentic and approachable, in my opinion.
    Have you ever had a yoga teacher that you were shy to drink coffee next to? That has happened to me…I promise you, you can drink coffee next to me. Fun fact… one of my students recently said to me. I was so happy when one day I saw you eating a chicken sandwich. Yes, I eat chicken and I do not hide it. People say I am really good at explaining things. I think it is because I was a gymnastics coach for a very long time and my years in the corporate environment allowed me to hone my communication skills. I think its a good combination. I have spent lots of time studying the philosophy of yoga so each class is sprinkled with a positive message from the scriptures, deepening your practice.

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Find a teacher that you can connect with. I recommend you research the lineage of your teacher. Find a teacher that will teach more than the postures, a teacher knowledgeable on the philosophy, the breath work and meditation. It will enrich your practice so much more.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    My current project is basically making sure that my health and wellness studio Energie EnCorps, based in Montreal continues to remain steady as we wait for Covid to pass. I have fantastic team of over 30 teachers, therapists and administrative staff that are like family to me. I need to guide this ship through this storm…

    What’s your favorite meal at a restaurant?

    I love Indian food and lots of spices. I think I was Indian in another life.

    What’s your favorite meal to make at home?

    Palak Paneer, a vegetarian indian dish

    What do you like to do for fun that’s non-yoga related?

    I also teach ZUMBA! For real!

    Who is your greatest inspiration?

    I have 3 boys… Luka, Jona and Kai. But my eldest son Luka, who is the cancer survivor is my greatest inspiration. He was just so brave. What is most inspirational is how he has been able to bounce out of that experience with no regrets and still so much passion for life.

    If you were stranded on an island what 3 things would you bring with you?

    My family, my yoga mat and my ukulele

    What’s your favorite TV series?

    Right now I am rewatching the 24 series on Netflix!

    What’s your favorite quote/affirmation/mantra?

    Little by little, a little becomes a lot…

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    By Rozel Gonzales

    Rozel Gonzales is a passionate yoga teacher, speaker and entrepreneur from Montreal, Canada. Following her son’s battle with cancer in 2010, Rozel left a successful corporate career to follow her dream and open the Energie EnCorps Wellness Centre. The centre is an expression of gratitude for her son’s remission and a platform to promote balanced and healthy living in body and mind. Rozel pours her heart and soul into uplifting others, teaching others to live in the present moment and to take the philosophy of yoga OFF THE MAT and into the world. Rozel has been teaching yoga and fitness since 1997. An Ashtanga trained teacher, she is the lead trainer for the Energie EnCorps Yoga Teacher Training program. Rozel continuously attends workshops and training around the world to update her skills and to build upon the foundations taught to her by her teachers Mark Darby and Manju Jois.

  • Interview with Adrian Molina

    I made my practice, piece-by-piece, learning here and there. The most effective practice is the one that is the most effective to the students that you have in front of you and makes them feel alive while safe and nurtured.

    Describe your personality in three words.

    Stubborn – Kind – Dedicated

    Where are you from and/or where do you live?

    I am from Buenos Aires, Argentina and I live in Miami Beach

    How long have you been practicing yoga and why did you start practicing yoga?

    I’ve been practicing since 2004 and I started practicing because the practice appeared at a time in life where I was ready.

    What is yoga to you?

    A way of connecting with the world, and through the world to myself.

    How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you want students to feel after they practice with you?

    I want them to feel exactly the same way I felt. Like if I was sent into a rocket to the moon and came back and I had the trip of my life.

    What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    Before I was a collection of thoughts, there was no integration, no perspective. Now there are thoughts, perspective, but there is also an internal base. A more calming perspective.

    Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what makes a good yoga teacher?

    I didn’t. The practice took me that path even when I resisted it. It was meant to be.

    Practice with Adrian LIVE on Omstars

    What style of yoga do you practice and what makes that style most effective? Do you have a teacher in your style of yoga?

    I don’t believe in styles. I don’t believe in gurus. I never had a yoga guru. I made my practice, piece-by-piece, learning here and there. The most effective practice is the one that is the most effective to the students that you have in front of you and makes them feel alive while safe and nurtured.

    What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice? 

    Achieve a level of recognition that continuously pulls my ego into believing that this is all about and continuing the process of humbling myself for the small things.

    What is yoga favorite yoga pose and why? And what’s your least favorite yoga pose and why?

    I don’t have favorite poses. I enjoy movement. Life is movement. Postures can be ecstatic. I enjoyed transitions more than postures.

    What has been the most inspirational moment you’ve experienced as a yoga student?

    Crying on the mat. And understanding that I was on the mat for solace and not for fitness.

    And how about as a teacher?

    The continuous love that inspires me to keep learning, giving, and living.

    Why do you practice? Why do you teach?

    I practice for health. I teach for love.

    What’s your favorite yoga quote or mantra?

    “Relax, nothing is under control.” –Pema Chodron.

    Get started with Adrian’s Warrior Flow classes on Omstars

    What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    Condensing everything into an Instagram post with a quote that have no connection to each other.

    What’s the most embarrassing thing that has ever happened to you as a student and as a teacher?

    You don’t want to know!

    Do you have any recommended yoga reading?

    Autobiography of a Yogi by Yogananda

    What is your dharma, your life mission?

    Discovering my dharma and my life mission

    What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Listen to yourself, lots of people talk, very few of them do.

    Are there any current projects you’re working on that you can tell us about?

    So many: teaching at prisons, hospitals, schools, community events.

    Aside from your fantastic course on Omstars, do you have a favorite class that you’d like to share?

    My husband, Dennis Hunter’s, courses and classes.

    By Adrian Molina

    Read more articles by Adrian Molina

    Adrian Molina is the founder of Warrior Flow. With over 15,000 hours of classroom teaching experience, Adrian is renowned for the sophistication and depth of his teaching style and the degree of mindfulness, compassion and precision he brings to asana practice. He is also a writer, massage therapist, Thai Yoga Bodywork practitioner, Reiki master, and a Kriya Yoga meditation practitioner in the lineage of Paramahansa Yogananda.

  • Lessons from 15 Years of Yoga Practice

    It has been almost 15 years since I took my first yoga certification. And it has been probably 14 years since I became a full-time yoga instructor. My life between the ages of 25 and 39 has centered around the practice and teaching and study and business of yoga.

    My practice has morphed so many times, like one of those beautiful cephalopods that change color based on the environment they are in. I could definitely say that my practice has always been a reflection of my life’s ups and downs. Many times my practice was the refuge to cope with life’s challenges; other times, the practice itself was the challenge. There were periods of love and hate. Closeness and distance and everything in between.

    I would like to share some of the things that I’ve learned over the years, things I’ve been reflecting upon lately. Hopefully this offers food for thought for those who are new to yoga; who knows, perhaps even for seasoned practitioners. This is based on my experience and it’s purely subjective.

    If 39-year old me could meet 25-year old me, this is the advice I would give him:

    You will learn a lot from your teachers. But the most important lessons will come from facing your own mind on the mat. Learn to listen to that voice, acknowledge it. And communicate with it.

    The postures are great. But the real gift is learning to treat your body with kindness and respect. At times you will use the practice and the postural aspect of it to satisfy your ego. Remember that this is a stage that many go through, look at the bigger picture, and remember the gifts of the practice are innumerable and they exceed the shape of a pose.

    Your teachers are human beings. They are real-estate brokers who became yoga teachers. Ex-lawyers. Moms who teach yoga. Sales executives who decided on a midlife change of career. Your teachers are not enlightened beings who descended to earth to spread enlightenment. The longer you hang around the yoga scene, the more you’ll notice that quite a few yoga teachers have a few missing screws. But others have genuine hearts and wisdom that shine through in every word and action.

    For the most part your teachers will want to share the teachings. When that is not the case, wish them well. They are teaching you a lesson. Even when their behavior doesn’t match your expectations or they fumble and embarrass themselves, they are showing you what kind of teacher you want to be (or don’t want to be) and for that we acknowledge their presence.

    Yoga is not a religion. Schools of yoga, and lineages, are often managed as corporations. Find out who are you studying with, and who they studied with and who that person studied with.

    Don’t drink any Kool-Aid. There are many Kool-Aids out there, and some of them are really toxic. But Yoga is Yoga. Learn all yogas that are wholesome and beneficial. Don’t push your style of yoga on anyone else. Everything has its own time.

    Be okay when the practice recedes to an old abandoned drawer. You might think that you’ve lost your love of yoga. That’s not true. It will change shapes, colors, intensity, rhythm, but the gifts of the practice will always belong to you.

    The greatest gift of learning Yoga will be sharing it with others. In being a teacher you will learn to communicate with others, to treat others with kindness, to empathize with others who are experiencing difficulty or pain, and in that process you will learn the meaning of forgiveness and tolerance. In the teachings of yoga you will find the strength to keep going when you feel defeated.

    Yoga will always be with you. You will practice yoga every moment of your life, whether or not you are standing on a mat. The practice and the teachings expand far beyond the studio walls. They encompass your ethical behaviors, your work choices, your way of speaking, who you associate with, what you eat and purchase. Ultimately they will be there with you in every breath, until the last one you take.

    By Adrian Molina

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    This blog post was originally featured on Warriorflow.com