• Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

    I have made it my personal mission to recreate healthy, cruelty-free versions of my all-time favorite recipes. Who doesn’t love chocolate chip cookies? They’re quick and easy to make on those nights when you just need a treat!

    These cookies are made with oat flour, which makes them gluten free, so even more of your friends can enjoy them. I chose coconut sugar for this recipe because it is quite similar to brown sugar, and has a rich flavor, without the high glycemic index. They’re a great dessert to take to a party due to the fact that most dietary restrictions will allow. If coconuts are a problem, you can always try other delicious flour and sugar options. When I serve these cookies at a get together, I always end up bringing home and empty plate–people love them!

    Ingredients

    • 2 Cups Oat Flour
    • 1-1/2 Tbsp Baking Powder
    • Dash of Salt
    • 1/2 Cup Coconut Sugar
    • 1 Tsp Cardamom
    • 1/2 Cup Vegan Chocolate Chips
    • 1/2 Cup Water
    • 1/4 Cup Vegan Butter, softened (any oil will work)
    • 1 Tbsp Vanilla (or choice flavoring)
    • 1 Squirt Lime/Lemon Juice

    Method

    • Preheat oven to 375 degrees
    • Mix all dry ingredients together in mixing bowl
    • Combine wet ingredients to dry, slowly adding water to achieve desired consistency. It should resemble cookie dough and form into balls. Add more oat flour or water if needed.
    • Place cookie dough balls about one inch apart on a (vegan) greased cookie sheet.
    • Put cookies in oven for approximately 10-15 minutes, cook times will vary depending on your oven, check at 10 minutes.
    • Remove cookies from oven, let cool for 5 minutes before serving. Enjoy!

    Don’t have time to bake? Due to this recipe’s vegan nature, you can even whip up a batch of edible cookie dough without the worry because it’s okay to eat raw!  Just prepare all of the ingredients, pop in the freezer for about an hour, and indulge!

    By Jodi Lane

    Jodi is the blog manager and marketing support here at Omstars and has been practicing Ashtanga yoga since 2017 through the teachings of Kino MacGregor. You may see her on Instagram as @kittytreets chatting with fellow yogis, vegan chefs, and artists. She loves cats, creating meaningful stories, and illustrating sincere pieces of art that reflect her passions.

  • Lemon Blueberry and Lavender Vegan Cheesecakes

    Lemon Blueberry and Lavender Cheesecakes, a little bit of raw heaven.  Try this no bake raw cheesecake and you will have everyone swooning.

    At first this may not seem like an obvious marriage. Isn’t three a crowd? But I love the combination of lavender and blueberries because the fruit lends it’s fabulous colour to match the hue of the lavender flavour, and lemon brings out the tartness of the fruit and gives a freshness to the healing lavender oil. I use culinary grade essential oils because it’s easier than messing about with distilling the dried blooms, but you can use either. The base for this recipe is adapted from my Lemon Slice. These photographs have not been boosted for colour or undergone any editing. Just like my food, they are natural, raw and minimally processed. I hope you enjoy this raw dessert recipe that would sit just as comfortably on the vegan or paleo plate. Bon appetite.

    Base Ingredients

    • 3/4 cup almonds
    • 1 cup dates pitted
    • 3/4 cup desiccated coconut
    • 3 tbs lemon rind (3 lemons)
    • 1/2 cup lemon juice or (Juice of 2 lemons)
    • 2 tbs Lacuma powder (optional)
    • 2 tbs coconut paste.

    Base Method

    Blend all all dry ingredients in food processor first. Then blend in the wet ingredients until it forms a dough that sticks together. Divide into 8 and press into 8 silicon cup cake molds. Refrigerate.

    Top Layer Ingredients

    • 1 cup cashews soaked for 5 hours or overnight
    • 2 tbs lemon rind
    • 1/2 cup coconut paste or oil
    • 1/4 cup lemon juice
    • 1 cup blueberries
    • 3/4 cup rice malt syrup
    • 3 drops of food grade lavender essential oil

    Top Layer Method

    In a food processor, blend nuts and coconut paste first until smooth. Add remaining ingredients blending and scraping down the sides as you go go. Once a creamy consistency is reached, pour onto lemon base. Freeze for several hours. Pop out of silicon molds when hard. Allow to defrost on bench 15 minutes before serving.

    If you love lavender, try Natalie’s Lavender Ice Cream on Omstars

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Natalie Prigoone is the author of The Great Uncooking a raw food detox book and A Piece of Cake: Easy Raw Desserts. She is a yoga teacher, high school teacher and raw food chef. Natalie discovered raw foods and their healing magic in 2011. She is passionate about healthy life hacks, and creating recipes that lead to greater health and healing. Follow her on Instagram @thegreatuncooking or Facebook.

  • How to Make Your Own Dukkah

    Dukkah is a roasted Middle Eastern spice and nut mix.
    Use it to coat foods or just dip fresh bread
    into it with some olive oil.

    This also makes a beautiful gift. Package it in a recycled jar and take it to your host the next time you are invited for dinner. You can also use this to make some fabulous vegan beetroot burgers.

    Ingredients

    • 2 tbs coriander seeds
    • 2 tbs cumin seeds
    • 1/4 cup sesame seeds
    • 3/4 cup almonds
    • Freshly ground salt and black pepper to your taste (I make mine quite salty).

    Method 

    • Dry fry (no oil) spices on on a medium heat for 2 minutes. Keep stirring to prevent burning.
    • Grind these toasted spices in a spice grinder or a mortar and pestle.
    • You may be tempted to skip the spice grinding and throw it all into the food processor. Don’t do this as it won’t grind up the spices and release their lovely aroma and flavour. Alternatively, you could use pre-ground cumin and coriander seeds, but it’s not as nice.
    • I fished out the unground seeds, and ground them in the spice grinder. Better to do it properly the first time.
    • Toast almonds and sesame seeds the same way, by dry frying and stirring at regular intervals to prevent burning. Add all spices, seasoning and nuts to food processor and blend until resembles fine bread crumbs. It is now ready to serve.

    Try More of Natalie’s Recipes on Omstars

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Natalie Prigoone is the author of ‘The Great Uncooking’ a raw food detox book and A Piece of Cake: Easy Raw Desserts. She is a yoga teacher, high school teacher and raw food chef. Natalie discovered raw foods and their healing magic in 2011. She is passionate about healthy life hacks, and creating recipes that lead to greater health and healing. Follow her on Instagram @thegreatuncooking or Facebook.

  • Ayurvedic Potion: Adaptogenic Golden Mylk

    This is my favorite tea to drink. I drink this multiple times a day, especially when I’m writing, and it’s adaptogenic golden mylk.

    So, what are adaptogens? Adaptogens are a type of herb that adapt to whatever your nervous system needs. So, let’s say you wake up, first thing in the morning, and you’re really tired, and you take an adaptogen.  That will actually bring up your energy, so, it’s a really good replacement for coffee, matcha, any other kind of stimulant, and there is no caffeine.

    Now, let’s say, you take that same adaptogen, at night. It will actually help cool you down, chill you out, and prepare you for sleep. So, they really adapt to whatever the nervous system needs at that time. Either, more energy, or bringing it down. So, it’s really good if you have a stressful job, adrenal fatigue, or anything like that. So, the adaptogen that I am using today is called, Ashwaghanda, and Ashwaghanda literally means, strength of a stallion. It’s a very commonly used adaptogen in Ayurveda, and formally was used more for men, to give them strength, but now a lot of women, we need that extra strength, too. So, Ashwaghanda is good for everyone, and the feminine version of it is called, Shatavari. And you can make this recipe with Shatavari, as well.

    So, golden mylk, a lot of people call this yogi tea, is a turmeric-based potion. The reason why turmeric is the base, is because turmeric is really anti-inflammatory. So, we spoke about how it’s really anti-inflammatory for the brain, and that helps it work as an anti-depressant. Clinical research has now found it as effective as Prozac, but it also works in the body. So, if you’re doing a lot of yoga, you’re doing a lot of exercise, physical activity, inflammation can be created over-time.  So, the turmeric is going to help just alleviate that so you feel much more agile, much more comfortable in your body.  So, it’s really good for everyone. Turmeric also helps burn belly fat, which is another really cool thing about it. It’s been found that it specifically works on fat in the mid-section, again, because it’s stress-related, cortisol-related.  So, turmeric really helps with that. So, I love turmeric for so many reasons, which is why it’s the base of golden mylk.

    Golden Mylk Powder Mixture

    • Turmeric
    • Ginger
    • Black Pepper
    • Ashwaghanda

    Golden Mylk Potion

    • Unsweetened non-dairy milk
    • Hot water
    • 1 teaspoon Golden Mylk Powder Mixture

    I like to make this ahead of time, I actually travel with it because I can just take a spoon and add it anywhere. It’s like a tea that requires really no steeping. So, again, turmeric, ginger, black pepper, and the ashwaghanda. Just mix up the powders. You can put it in a little glass jar, travel with it, keep it with you at home. You can actually kind of customize it to what you want. So, let’s say you want it a little bit more spicy, a little bit more gingery, you can crank that up. You can add more black pepper, less black pepper, again, there’s really no rules, just make sure you have the ingredients in there somewhere.

    Learn more with Sahara’s Ayurveda course on Omstars

    By Sahara Rose Ketabi

    Sahara Rose is the best-selling author of the Idiot’s Guide to Ayurveda, which is the #1 best-selling Ayurveda book globally and Eat Feel Fresh: A Plant-Based Ayurvedic Cookbook. She has been called “a leading voice for the millennial generation into the new paradigm shift” by Deepak Chopra, who wrote the foreword of both her titles. Sahara hosts the Highest Self Podcast, ranked as the #1 top podcast in the spirituality category on iTunes. Sahara’s mission is to awaken people to their innate potential so they can share their gifts and fulfill their purpose on this planet. “This is Ayurveda’s next evolutionary step. Sahara Rose has successfully refreshed and revitalized the ancient knowledge without watering down its significance and depth. She blends reverence for the tradition with an awareness of present-day needs. Find more wisdom on Sahara’s website or Instagram.

  • Almond-Crusted Avocado Crispies

    I love avocado and I’ve heard about Avocado Fries but never managed to try them. So I figured that I’d see if I could make them. It was the perfect test for my new Air Fryer. First, let’s talk about fried food. I have to say that as an average American girl I grew up on french fries, onion rings and various other deep fried foods. So I have a nostalgic taste for those unhealthy greasy bits of crispiness. Once I was teenager and got conscious about the impact of fried foods on my health, my diet and my skin I stopped eating them so often. But the love has never left my heart. I tried fried plantains that a friend made in her air fryer and I could not believe that they weren’t deep fried, so I searched for a good Air Fryer and got one. They’re not too expensive for a kitchen appliance. Well sure, you can get the super expensive luxury version, but really they’re all the same. Mine cost about $60 and I got it on Amazon. Truthfully, what I was most interested in when choosing is that the color matched the rest of my kitchen (white).

    Ok, now on to the avocado fries. These were really easy to make and with the Air Fryer the clean up time was minimal. If I’m going to cook something it has to be quick and easy. While I respect and love when people take the time to go through multiple steps and put in hours in the kitchen, it’s just not me. Another thing about me is that I’m an improviser, not a traditionalist when it comes to recipes. If I want to make something that I haven’t before I often do a quick google search for recipes to get the general gist of what the process is like. Then I usually see what’s in stock in my pantry and go from there.

    The avocado you choose for the frying process should be ripe but firm. If it’s too mushy to stay together on its own, the wedges are going to fall apart in the fryer. Most avocado fry recipes will call for Panko or some other form of bread crumbs. I do not usually keep bread crumbs as a staple in my kitchen, so I had to substitute something else. I used almond meal instead and it ended up giving the crust coating on the avocado a nice flavor and an added health punch too. The other thing many recipes say is really important when it comes to making fries in the Air Fryer is that the avocado has to be coated in something to make the breading stick to it while it’s frying. The most common option suggested is aquafaba for a good vegan substitute for egg in the prep stages. While I did have a can of chickpeas, the idea of opening the can and draining out the liquid just didn’t appeal to me (can someone please make aquafaba that you can just buy and have handy without having to drain chickpeas? See what I mean about my need for things to be easy in the kitchen lol). I did for a moment think about making falafel in the Air Fryer with the chickpeas (and I still might) but I figured it was a good idea not to get ahead of myself in my lazy kitchen persona. So, again, I improvised. Instead of aquafina I coated the avocado lightly in olive oil. This worked surprisingly well to keep the almond meal attached to the avocado during the air drying process and they stayed on after while I was eating them. Overall I was pretty happy with the result.

    Now some people wouldn’t call these real fries. Ok, point taken. But they are quite yummy. That’s why I called my recipe Almond-crusted Avocado Crispies instead. Something really cool happens to the avocado in the Air Fryer. The almond meal on the outside gets crispy and then the outer layer of the avocado turns into a kind of protective layer and changes color ever so slightly. Then, the inside is the warm juicy super green avocado that seems to get even more creamy in contrast to the crispy layer outside. I’d recommend sprinkling with a finely ground sea salt, either in the crusting stage or immediately after they’re ready. You could eat these on their own and serve with an aioli or even plain old ketchup and mustard. Or, they’d be great to top off a salad to add another layer or richness.

    Prep time: 5-10 minutes
    Cook time: 10 minutes

    Recipe

    Ingredients:
    Almond meal or panko bread crumbs
    1 ripe but firm avocado
    Olive oil or aquafaba
    Sea salt

    Instructions:

    1. Grind up a small handful of almonds with a pinch of sea salt and place in bowl. I used soaked and sprouted almonds because I’m obsessed with sprouted nuts. I used my Vitamix blender on the dry setting to pulverize the almonds. You could use ready made almond meal if you have it or roasted or raw almonds, or really any nut works. I’m thinking of trying it with Macadamia nuts next time. And of course you could also use bread crumbs. If you’re sensitive to salt you could wait to salt them until after.

    2. Cut one whole ripe but firm avocado into bite-sized wedges.

    3. Lightly coat the avocado in olive oil (or aquafaba).

    4. Place the avocado in the bowl with the almond meal and gently coat each piece with the almond meal.

    5. Line the bottom of your air fryer basket with the coated avocado pieces and get ready.

    6. Turn the Air Fryer on 390F and set the timer for 10 minutes. At 5 minutes you might want to shake them or turn them over.

    7. Reach gently into the Air Fryer with tongs and collect your avocado crispies. One small thing to note is that if you haven’t used an Air Fryer before they get really hot so be careful Let the Air Fryer fully cool down before you start thinking about cleaning it. The basket can easily be washed by hand or usually put right in the dishwasher (always check your Air Fryer manual to be sure that your basket is dishwasher safe).

    By Kino MacGregor

    Try More Vegan Recipes On OMstars – The Yoga Network

    Kino MacGregor is a world renowned yoga teacher, the youngest ever teacher to be certified in Ashtanga Yoga by Sri K. Pattabhi Jois, author of several yoga books, and the founder of OMstars.com

  • Cucumber Pasta – Not Your Average Pesto

    Contrary to what many people believe, eating an entirely plant based diet is not difficult at all! There are all sorts of great recipes out there for you to try if your experimenting with a vegan lifestyle change, or jumping in head first. We love sharing plant-based recipes from awesome foodies like Adam Kenworthy, and today we are sharing his recipe for Cucumber Pasta with a homemade pesto sauce.

    Robust flavor, unbelievably hydrating.  Will leave you refreshed and vibrant.

    Ingredients:

    • Parsley
    • Cilantro
    • Basil
    • Pumpkin Seeds
    • Pine Nuts
    • Hemp Seeds
    • Coriander Seeds
    • Pink Himalayan Salt
    • 1 Jalapeno (no seeds)
    • Black pepper
    • Lemon
    • 3 Cucumbers
    • Garlic
    • V.O.O

    Noodle Preparation:

    Begin with grating the cucumbers. If the cucumber is organic I grate with the skin.  If it is not organic cut the skin off and toss it.  Many of the chemical residues are found in the skin.  Just another reason to buy organic, because the skin of the cucumber contains many vitamins and minerals.   I find the best way is to grate into a strainer.  Use a pot underneath the strainer to catch the cucumber juice coming from the grated cucumber noodles.  Once all three are grated gently press to remove the rest of the juice.  pour the juice into a glass.

    Pesto Preparation:

    Toss the parsley, cilantro and basil into a food processor or blender. Add in the hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds and pine nuts.  Next throw in the pink himalayan salt, black pepper,  jalapeno sliced with no seeds and one clove of garlic.  Finish off by adding juice squeezed from half of a lemon and extra virgin olive oil (a friendly dash).  Add a touch of the cucumber juice set aside.   If it is too thick, the cucumber juice does a great job of making it a lighter more whipped pesto which I find it great not only with pasta but also as a spread or a dip.

    Plating

    Add the noodles which have much of the juice squeezed out through a strainer into a separate bowl.  Add a generous amount of pesto and mix together.  Put the noodles and pesto mixture onto a plate. Optional garnish on top is halved grape or cherry tomatoes.  Place a peice of parsley on top to finish off the plate.  Lightly sprinkle a little salt and pepper on top for the finishing touch.

    By Adam Kenworthy

    Adam is a private chef & healthy living coach who divides his time between working in New York City and Nicaragua, where he has founded a non-profit organic fruit farm (Finca Santa Marta.) In his spare time, he can be found trail running in Central park and finding serenity in the waves of Long Island.

    See More From Adam On Instagram

    Find Plant Based Recipes On OmStars

  • Gut-Friendly Marrakesh Casserole

    As a practice, yoga asks us to explore the deepest regions, capabilities, and limitations of our bodies, minds, and spirits (among other things). As such, the practice of yoga asks us to take good care of our bodies and stay in optimum health, so that we can move through practice with more ease, and sit comfortably in meditation for longer periods of time. That means only feeding our bodies with the most nourishing foods available. Today’s recipe, by Lee Holmes, is a probiotic-rich Marrakesh Casserole that when eaten slowly and mindfully, will help nourish you from the inside out so that you can engage in a stronger, more comfortable, and all around better practice.

    Ingredients:

    • 60 ml (2 fl oz or ¼ cup) cold-presses extra virgin olive oil
    • 1 large onion roughly chopped
    • 3 garlic cloves minced
    • 2 cm (¾ inch) piece of ginger, minced
    • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
    • 1 teaspoon cumin
    • 1 tablespoon turmeric
    • ¼ teaspoon Celtic sea salt
    • 2-3 teaspoons dried harissa
    • 400 g (14 oz) tin diced tomatoes
    • 1 tablespoon rice malt syrup
    • Juice of 1 lemon
    • ¼ cup coriander (cilantro) leaves
    • ¼ cup chopped mint leaves
    • 1 small pumpkin (winter squash), peeled and cut into 5 cm (2-inch) pieces
    • 1 sweet potato, peeled and cut into 5 cm (2-inch) pieces
    • 3 carrots, peeled and cut into 5 cm (2-inch) pieces
    • 1 zucchini (courgetti), cut into 5 cm (2-inch) pieces
    • 400 g (14 oz) tin chickpeas
    • Cooked quinoa to serve
    • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest, to serve
    • Mint leaves to serve
    • 80 g (½ cup) almonds to serve

    Directions

    • Heat the olive oil in a flame-proof tagine pot or casserole dish over medium heat, and sauté the onion for 5 minutes (until translucent).
    • Add the garlic, ginger and spices. Stir well to combine.
    • Add the harissa, tomatoes, rice malt syrup, lemon juice, coriander and mint. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat.
    • Add the pumpkin, sweet potato, carrot and zucchini. Stir well so they are all covered in the sauce, and simmer with a lid, for 1-hour
    • Add the chickpeas and cook for 5 minutes more.
    • Serve on a bed of quinoa, topped with coriander, lemon zest, and roasted almonds.

    Recipe by Lee Holmes

    Check Out Lee’s Gut-Healing Post That Goes With This Recipe

    Follow her on instagram for more inspiration