• Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

    I have made it my personal mission to recreate healthy, cruelty-free versions of my all-time favorite recipes. Who doesn’t love chocolate chip cookies? They’re quick and easy to make on those nights when you just need a treat!

    These cookies are made with oat flour, which makes them gluten free, so even more of your friends can enjoy them. I chose coconut sugar for this recipe because it is quite similar to brown sugar, and has a rich flavor, without the high glycemic index. They’re a great dessert to take to a party due to the fact that most dietary restrictions will allow. If coconuts are a problem, you can always try other delicious flour and sugar options. When I serve these cookies at a get together, I always end up bringing home and empty plate–people love them!

    Ingredients

    • 2 Cups Oat Flour
    • 1-1/2 Tbsp Baking Powder
    • Dash of Salt
    • 1/2 Cup Coconut Sugar
    • 1 Tsp Cardamom
    • 1/2 Cup Vegan Chocolate Chips
    • 1/2 Cup Water
    • 1/4 Cup Vegan Butter, softened (any oil will work)
    • 1 Tbsp Vanilla (or choice flavoring)
    • 1 Squirt Lime/Lemon Juice

    Method

    • Preheat oven to 375 degrees
    • Mix all dry ingredients together in mixing bowl
    • Combine wet ingredients to dry, slowly adding water to achieve desired consistency. It should resemble cookie dough and form into balls. Add more oat flour or water if needed.
    • Place cookie dough balls about one inch apart on a (vegan) greased cookie sheet.
    • Put cookies in oven for approximately 10-15 minutes, cook times will vary depending on your oven, check at 10 minutes.
    • Remove cookies from oven, let cool for 5 minutes before serving. Enjoy!

    Don’t have time to bake? Due to this recipe’s vegan nature, you can even whip up a batch of edible cookie dough without the worry because it’s okay to eat raw!  Just prepare all of the ingredients, pop in the freezer for about an hour, and indulge!

    By Jodi Lane

    Jodi is the blog manager and marketing support here at Omstars and has been practicing Ashtanga yoga since 2017 through the teachings of Kino MacGregor. You may see her on Instagram as @kittytreets chatting with fellow yogis, vegan chefs, and artists. She loves cats, creating meaningful stories, and illustrating sincere pieces of art that reflect her passions.

  • Coconut Oil Versus Coconut Paste

    What’s the difference between coconut oil, coconut paste, and coconut butter? With all things equal, coconut oil is not the same as coconut paste. 

    While all these products are made from coconuts they have different properties and serve different culinary purposes.

    Coconut Oil

    Coconut Oil is the oil from the coconut. When it is cold it sets into what looks like a butter (hence the confusion). When coconut oil is warmed to above 24 degrees Celsius (76 Fahrenheit) it melts to form a liquid. It’s great for a range of cooking purposes, bug repellent, massage, beauty products, tooth or gum pain, a metabolism booster and so on. I love the stuff it is truly a panacea.

    Coconut Paste

    Coconut Paste is the whole coconut (flesh and oil) ground down into a smooth fudge like paste. It is sweet and delicious and fabulous in desserts. Try a spoonful with some orange segments and juice and you have a simple heavenly dessert. Coconut paste is not available everywhere and is somewhat of a specialty that you may need to ask for specifically, or you will be palmed off with some regular coconut oil. Coconut Butter is the same thing as coconut paste but is what Americans call it.

    Sometimes downing a spoonful of coconut oil is a chore. Not so with coconut paste. The one on the left is like dessert in a jar. Coconut paste has the fiber of the coconut meat and remains in a solid state at warmer temperature. It won’t really ever turn into a liquid, but when warm, can become a very viscous batter/paste. I love to use this in desserts because it lends itself to a fudge texture and supplies a boost of sweetness. I wouldn’t be trying to gargle with this to alleviate a sore throat like I would with coconut oil and I also wouldn’t rub this on my skin. The oil is perfect for that and cheaper.

    On the left is the fudge paste, on the right is the ubiquitous oil. Moral of the story? They are different and it is worth getting your hands on some so you can taste the difference. If you were in a pinch and unable to locate coconut paste, you could use coconut oil in lieu, but it won’t supply the taste or texture that the recipe maker was aiming to give you.

    Learn to Make Coconut Youghurt with Natalie on Omstars

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Natalie Prigoone is the author of The Great Uncooking a raw food detox book and A Piece of Cake: Easy Raw Desserts. She is a yoga teacher, high school teacher and raw food chef. Natalie discovered raw foods and their healing magic in 2011. She is passionate about healthy life hacks, and creating recipes that lead to greater health and healing. Follow her on Instagram @thegreatuncooking or Facebook.

  • Lemon Blueberry and Lavender Vegan Cheesecakes

    Lemon Blueberry and Lavender Cheesecakes, a little bit of raw heaven.  Try this no bake raw cheesecake and you will have everyone swooning.

    At first this may not seem like an obvious marriage. Isn’t three a crowd? But I love the combination of lavender and blueberries because the fruit lends it’s fabulous colour to match the hue of the lavender flavour, and lemon brings out the tartness of the fruit and gives a freshness to the healing lavender oil. I use culinary grade essential oils because it’s easier than messing about with distilling the dried blooms, but you can use either. The base for this recipe is adapted from my Lemon Slice. These photographs have not been boosted for colour or undergone any editing. Just like my food, they are natural, raw and minimally processed. I hope you enjoy this raw dessert recipe that would sit just as comfortably on the vegan or paleo plate. Bon appetite.

    Base Ingredients

    • 3/4 cup almonds
    • 1 cup dates pitted
    • 3/4 cup desiccated coconut
    • 3 tbs lemon rind (3 lemons)
    • 1/2 cup lemon juice or (Juice of 2 lemons)
    • 2 tbs Lacuma powder (optional)
    • 2 tbs coconut paste.

    Base Method

    Blend all all dry ingredients in food processor first. Then blend in the wet ingredients until it forms a dough that sticks together. Divide into 8 and press into 8 silicon cup cake molds. Refrigerate.

    Top Layer Ingredients

    • 1 cup cashews soaked for 5 hours or overnight
    • 2 tbs lemon rind
    • 1/2 cup coconut paste or oil
    • 1/4 cup lemon juice
    • 1 cup blueberries
    • 3/4 cup rice malt syrup
    • 3 drops of food grade lavender essential oil

    Top Layer Method

    In a food processor, blend nuts and coconut paste first until smooth. Add remaining ingredients blending and scraping down the sides as you go go. Once a creamy consistency is reached, pour onto lemon base. Freeze for several hours. Pop out of silicon molds when hard. Allow to defrost on bench 15 minutes before serving.

    If you love lavender, try Natalie’s Lavender Ice Cream on Omstars

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Natalie Prigoone is the author of The Great Uncooking a raw food detox book and A Piece of Cake: Easy Raw Desserts. She is a yoga teacher, high school teacher and raw food chef. Natalie discovered raw foods and their healing magic in 2011. She is passionate about healthy life hacks, and creating recipes that lead to greater health and healing. Follow her on Instagram @thegreatuncooking or Facebook.

  • How to Make Your Own Dukkah

    Dukkah is a roasted Middle Eastern spice and nut mix.
    Use it to coat foods or just dip fresh bread
    into it with some olive oil.

    This also makes a beautiful gift. Package it in a recycled jar and take it to your host the next time you are invited for dinner. You can also use this to make some fabulous vegan beetroot burgers.

    Ingredients

    • 2 tbs coriander seeds
    • 2 tbs cumin seeds
    • 1/4 cup sesame seeds
    • 3/4 cup almonds
    • Freshly ground salt and black pepper to your taste (I make mine quite salty).

    Method 

    • Dry fry (no oil) spices on on a medium heat for 2 minutes. Keep stirring to prevent burning.
    • Grind these toasted spices in a spice grinder or a mortar and pestle.
    • You may be tempted to skip the spice grinding and throw it all into the food processor. Don’t do this as it won’t grind up the spices and release their lovely aroma and flavour. Alternatively, you could use pre-ground cumin and coriander seeds, but it’s not as nice.
    • I fished out the unground seeds, and ground them in the spice grinder. Better to do it properly the first time.
    • Toast almonds and sesame seeds the same way, by dry frying and stirring at regular intervals to prevent burning. Add all spices, seasoning and nuts to food processor and blend until resembles fine bread crumbs. It is now ready to serve.

    Try More of Natalie’s Recipes on Omstars

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Natalie Prigoone is the author of ‘The Great Uncooking’ a raw food detox book and A Piece of Cake: Easy Raw Desserts. She is a yoga teacher, high school teacher and raw food chef. Natalie discovered raw foods and their healing magic in 2011. She is passionate about healthy life hacks, and creating recipes that lead to greater health and healing. Follow her on Instagram @thegreatuncooking or Facebook.

  • Ayurvedic Potion: Adaptogenic Golden Mylk

    This is my favorite tea to drink. I drink this multiple times a day, especially when I’m writing, and it’s adaptogenic golden mylk.

    So, what are adaptogens? Adaptogens are a type of herb that adapt to whatever your nervous system needs. So, let’s say you wake up, first thing in the morning, and you’re really tired, and you take an adaptogen.  That will actually bring up your energy, so, it’s a really good replacement for coffee, matcha, any other kind of stimulant, and there is no caffeine.

    Now, let’s say, you take that same adaptogen, at night. It will actually help cool you down, chill you out, and prepare you for sleep. So, they really adapt to whatever the nervous system needs at that time. Either, more energy, or bringing it down. So, it’s really good if you have a stressful job, adrenal fatigue, or anything like that. So, the adaptogen that I am using today is called, Ashwaghanda, and Ashwaghanda literally means, strength of a stallion. It’s a very commonly used adaptogen in Ayurveda, and formally was used more for men, to give them strength, but now a lot of women, we need that extra strength, too. So, Ashwaghanda is good for everyone, and the feminine version of it is called, Shatavari. And you can make this recipe with Shatavari, as well.

    So, golden mylk, a lot of people call this yogi tea, is a turmeric-based potion. The reason why turmeric is the base, is because turmeric is really anti-inflammatory. So, we spoke about how it’s really anti-inflammatory for the brain, and that helps it work as an anti-depressant. Clinical research has now found it as effective as Prozac, but it also works in the body. So, if you’re doing a lot of yoga, you’re doing a lot of exercise, physical activity, inflammation can be created over-time.  So, the turmeric is going to help just alleviate that so you feel much more agile, much more comfortable in your body.  So, it’s really good for everyone. Turmeric also helps burn belly fat, which is another really cool thing about it. It’s been found that it specifically works on fat in the mid-section, again, because it’s stress-related, cortisol-related.  So, turmeric really helps with that. So, I love turmeric for so many reasons, which is why it’s the base of golden mylk.

    Golden Mylk Powder Mixture

    • Turmeric
    • Ginger
    • Black Pepper
    • Ashwaghanda

    Golden Mylk Potion

    • Unsweetened non-dairy milk
    • Hot water
    • 1 teaspoon Golden Mylk Powder Mixture

    I like to make this ahead of time, I actually travel with it because I can just take a spoon and add it anywhere. It’s like a tea that requires really no steeping. So, again, turmeric, ginger, black pepper, and the ashwaghanda. Just mix up the powders. You can put it in a little glass jar, travel with it, keep it with you at home. You can actually kind of customize it to what you want. So, let’s say you want it a little bit more spicy, a little bit more gingery, you can crank that up. You can add more black pepper, less black pepper, again, there’s really no rules, just make sure you have the ingredients in there somewhere.

    Learn more with Sahara’s Ayurveda course on Omstars

    By Sahara Rose Ketabi

    Sahara Rose is the best-selling author of the Idiot’s Guide to Ayurveda, which is the #1 best-selling Ayurveda book globally and Eat Feel Fresh: A Plant-Based Ayurvedic Cookbook. She has been called “a leading voice for the millennial generation into the new paradigm shift” by Deepak Chopra, who wrote the foreword of both her titles. Sahara hosts the Highest Self Podcast, ranked as the #1 top podcast in the spirituality category on iTunes. Sahara’s mission is to awaken people to their innate potential so they can share their gifts and fulfill their purpose on this planet. “This is Ayurveda’s next evolutionary step. Sahara Rose has successfully refreshed and revitalized the ancient knowledge without watering down its significance and depth. She blends reverence for the tradition with an awareness of present-day needs. Find more wisdom on Sahara’s website or Instagram.

  • Creamy Tomato Pasta with Devyn Howard

    The dish that I am making for you guys today is inspired by something that I loved when I studied abroad in Florence, Italy.

    It was a gnocchi rosa.  It was this creamy tomato sauce, so beautiful and full of flavor, but it had cream in it. So, it’s definitely something that I wouldn’t want to eat now. I decided that I needed to recreate this beloved dish of mine, and that’s how this creamy tomato pasta was born. The dish gets its creaminess from soaked cashews.

    Ingredients

    • 1 12-Oz. Can Crushed Tomatoes
    • 2 Red Bell Peppers
    • ½ Red Onion
    • 1 Clove Garlic
    • 5 Tablespoons Italian Seasoning
    • 1 14-Oz. Box of Vegan Pasta
    • 3 Tablespoons EVOO Salt
    • Pepper to Taste
    • Fresh Basil to Garnish
    • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
    • 1 Cup Soaked (overnight) Cashews

     

    Method

    In a pan, heat up the olive oil, the sauté the red bell peppers, onion, and garlic until the onion is translucent and the peppers and garlic are tender. Pour in the crushed tomatoes and their juices, mix everything together and then let simmer. Start a pot of water boiling for the pasta. In a blender, blend together the soaked cashews and ¾ cup of water until smooth and creamy. Add the pasta to the boiling water. Season the tomato and pepper mixture with salt, pepper, and the Italian seasoning. Then, add the blended cashew mixture to the tomato and pepper sauce, and mix together well until it’s creamy. Using a strainer, drain the pasta. Then add it to the sauce mixture. Toss well and serve.

    Continue cooking with Devyn on Omstars

    By Devyn Howard

    My name is Devyn Howard, and I am a vegan food blogger from San Diego, CA. At 11-years-old, I realized that it didn’t morally make sense for me to continue eating meat as I made the connection that the animals on my plate were the same animals I adored when they were alive. From that point on, I dedicated much of my life to promoting vegetarianism, veganism, and cruelty-free living. I’m eager to show the world that veganism can be incredibly easy, fulfilling, and delicious, even while traveling the world. I share restaurant recommendations from around the globe, proving that a cruelty-free lifestyle need not inhibit one’s experience in a new culture. Traveling from Asia, to Australia, through Europe, and the U.S. is always an exciting foodie adventure…even as a vegan! I’m currently based in Los Angeles, CA, and have plans to take over the world one plant-based plate at a time. Join me on my adventure! Connect with Devyn on Instagram. 

  • All Squashed Up

     

    Here are some simple ways to make two types of squash, two ways.  The varieties of squash for this dish include Acorn and Butternut.

    Ingredients

    • Butternut Squash
    • Acorn Squash
    • Coconut Oil
    • Rosemary Leaf
    • Sprouted Quinoa
    • Avocado
    • Alfalfa Sprouts
    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    • Basil
    • Garlic
    • Pink Himalayan Salt
    • Black Pepper

    Directions

    Sprouted Quinoa

    The first part of the recipe began the night before – you may also buy sprouted quinoa.  I like to soak quinoa the night before I cook it. This allows the quinoa to sprout and also deactivate the enzyme inhibitors. Sprouting quinoa can be achieved very easily by placing raw quinoa in a bowl of clean, non-chlorinated water at room temperature, overnight. Once done, the grains will be noticeably softer and make an excellent addition to salads or other cold meals. You can put it in a cheese cloth or a nut milk bag to drain the water and leave it in the sunlight for a day to allow the quinoa to sprout even more.  If you wish to let the sprouts go wild, this process can be repeated for several days.  Just remember to rinse the quinoa twice per day and leave in the cheesecloth or nut milk bag.

    The science behind the sprouting process and its effect on the seed and the human digestive system is fascinating.  Humans do not have the digestive enzymes necessary to break down the fibers contained in grains, nuts, seeds and legumes. Through the sprouting process, gases are released which activate the natural enzymes and release the nutrients, making them available and easier for human digestion. Germinated seeds are easier to digest and the large intestine does not need to produce bacteria to break down the fiber, avoiding the fermentation process which turns the large intestine acid, when it should be alkaline.

    All grains and seeds contain enzyme inhibitors that interfere with the absorption of proteins, cause gastric distress, and deficiencies in amino acids. They also contain phytates (phytic acid) which block the intestinal absorption of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, copper and zinc which are necessary for strong bones, teeth and for overall health.

    The sprouting process allows enzymes, lactobacilli and other helpful organisms neutralize phytic acid, remove enzyme inhibitors and break down complex starches.

    The quinoa will cook quickly since it has been sprouted overnight.  Add a little bit of coconut oil to a pan with rosemary.  Let the rosemary slowly cook in the oil.  Once it appears to be lightly browning, add in chopped garlic and let cook for 3 mins in the coconut oil. Add the sprouted quinoa and just enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, the quinoa should not be covered. Heat is still medium. Keep stirring throughout and add in chopped basil, pink Himalayan salt and black pepper.  Fluff to finish.

    Butternut Squash

    Next step in the recipe is to cut the tips off the butternut squash, chop in half the long way, then remove seeds. Take the skin off, easiest with a peeler. Chop into small cubes and place into a large pan.   Add a small amount of Coconut oil to the pan.  Next, add in rosemary leaf and cook on medium for 10 mins, stirring every couple of minutes.  Once the squash is close to being done, or soft,  toss in chopped garlic.  The garlic will cook in 5 mins or less at medium heat, which will allow the flavor to be released into the squash without overcooking it.

    Acorn Squash

    While the butternut squash is cooking, preheat the oven to 350.  Chop the tips off the acorn squash, just enough so that it sits flat on a baking tray.  Halve the acorn squash and clean out the seeds.  Add a small amount of coconut oil to each half.   Put the Squash in the oven for approx. 20 – 30 mins.  If you like, finish them off in the broiler to brown the tops.

    Wilted Kale

    Add chopped purple kale to another pan and put on light heat to wilt. Lightly salt and pepper.

    Plating

    Butternut Squash

    To plate the butternut squash dish, you can achieve a simple and beautiful layering effect by using a small bowl.  Start with the butternut squash on the bottom.  Next put the kale, followed by the quinoa.  Press the quinoa down so that all the ingredients are pressed tightly into the bowl.  Cover the bowl with a plate and flip upside down, give it a few taps on the bottom of the bowl to release and remove.  Garnish with avocado and sprouts.  Finish off with light salt, pepper and extra virgin olive oil.

    Acorn Squash

    Once the acorn squash is done, remove from oven and fill with the cooked quinoa.  Top with sliced avocado and add light salt and pepper.  Finish with a light drizzle of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    Vallaha, there you have it, all squashed up.  Buen Provecho.

    Health Benefits

    Butternut Squash

    When shopping for butternut squash (technically a fruit), look for a matte color on the skin.  A squash with a shiny skin indicates that it was picked to early.  No need to refrigerate the squash, just place in a well-ventilated area and it will keep for up to 3 months.  Up to a week if cut up and covered in the fridge

    The most notable befits of butternut squash are in it’s color. The color signals an abundance of powerhouse nutrients known as carotenoids, shown to protect against heart disease. In particular, the gourd boasts very high levels of beta-carotene (which your body converts to vitamin A) and one cup of butternut squash contains 50% of the recommended daily dose of antioxidant rich vitamin C.

    And in case you aren’t already sold, butternut squash has been shown to be a very powerful anti-inflammatory, making this fruit great for athletes as well as people suffering from disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and asthma.

    Acorn Squash

    Acorn squash contains vitamin A, niacin, folate, thiamine and vitamin B-6, but it is an especially good source of vitamin C. One half cup of cooked acorn squash provides about 20 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C. Adequate vitamin C promotes the health of the immune and skeletal systems and may help prevent hypertension, heart disease, cancer and osteoarthritis. The vitamin C content of foods is degraded by exposure to air, light, heat and water. To maximize the amount of vitamin C you receive from acorn squash, use the fruit three to four days after purchase and cut immediately before cooking. Steam or bake the squash instead of boiling it to keep vitamin C from being lost in the cooking water.

    Each half-cup serving of acorn squash contains 13 percent of the recommended daily intake of potassium and 11 percent of that for magnesium. As both a mineral and an electrolyte, potassium plays a vital role in muscle contraction and in maintaining the body’s water balance. Magnesium regulates potassium levels, strengthens bones and teeth, and aids in proper energy metabolism. Regularly eating potassium- and magnesium-rich foods like acorn squash, can lessen your chance of stroke, osteoporosis, depression and diabetes. Acorn squash also contains small amounts of iron, calcium, zinc and phosphorus.

    By Adam Kenworthy

    Adam’s passion and appreciation for cooking arose from his love for extreme sports. Having participated in many tests of physical and mental endurance he quickly realized the impact a healthy and well balanced diet played on his overall performance. Adam began to study various aspects of plant based diets, holistic remedies, and culinary techniques from around the world. Through the use of organic, farm-to-table ingredients, Adam hopes to inspire many to reconsider their current eating habits and direct them toward a more sustainable lifestyle.  He believes that conscious eating is the key to living a more healthy and vibrant co-existence with Mother Nature.

     

    Learn More from Adam on Omstars

     

  • The Best Paleo Granola Bars

     

    Whether you call them granola or muesli bars – these are vegan, free from refined sugar and grains. This makes them also a gluten free granola bar. In truth, it’s a nut bar. So delicious. Paleo Granola Bar recipe below.

    The perfect pocket sized snack or lunch box treats. I’ve made these a number of times and I like them best when they are crunchy. So cook them low and slow. Additionally I like to cut them smaller as they are quite filling. Why bother with Paleo if you are vegan? Well, quite simply, it’s possible to be an unhealthy vegan if you fill your diet with wheat and flour based foods. Anytime you can swap the wheat out for something more nutritionally dense, you are doing yourself a favor. I don’t want to bang on about wheat flour here, (as so many experts have already written much about the topic), just make this and eat it because it’s delicious! You have the added benefit of knowing it is healthier than the regular shop bought muesli bars laden with sugar.

    Hemp seed powder

    These crunchy paleo granola bars have the addition of hemp powder. This gives them an extra protein boost. If you don’t have hemp powder you could swap for oats or leave it out completely. You could also leave out the tahini, but I include it because it is an excellent source of calcium.

    NOTE: What is just as important as putting nutritious food into your body? Having your body be able to extract and absorb the nutrients. For this reason I recommend soaking the nuts first and then drying them in a dehydrator. This will remove the inhibitor enzymes and make them easier to digest. Of course, like you, I sometimes can’t be bothered with all that and have still made this successfully without soaking the nuts first. Both work. But if you have the time, soak overnight then rinse and dry out in the dehydrator or oven on a low temp. Below 47 Degrees Celsius. Drizzle granola bar with chocolate. Make your own or use shop bought vegan dark chocolate.

    Ingredients

    • 3 1/2 cups of mixed raw nuts
    • 1/2 cup pepitas and sunflower seeds
    • 1 cup dried fruit (I used a mix of apricots, sultanas and currants)
    • 1/2 cup desiccated coconut
    • 1/3 cup coconut oil
    • 1/3 cup rice malt syrup
    • 1/2 cup almond butter
    • 1 tbs tahini
    • 2 tbs hemp powder
    • 3 tsp Maldon sea salt flakes
    • 1 tbs pure vanilla essence or extract

    Method

    On a low heat, melt the oil, tahini, nut butter, rice malt syrup, salt, and vanilla. Mix well in the saucepan until combined. Add in vanilla and cinnamon. In a food processor, blend half the nuts, all the hemp powder and all of the desiccated coconut until fine crumb. Roughly pulse in the remaining nuts and seeds so still chunky. Mix in fruit. Combine wet ingredients with dry. Mix well. Press into a lamination tray lined with baking paper. Bake in a low oven (160 degrees Celsius) for about 30 minutes. Be careful not to burn the nuts bars. When golden toasted, pull out bars and cut into slices while still warm. Allow to cool and top with melted dark chocolate. Store in fridge. Store in an airtight container.

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Natalie Prigoone is the author of ‘The Great Uncooking’ a raw food detox book and A Piece of Cake: Easy Raw Desserts. She is a yoga teacher, high school teacher and raw food chef. Natalie discovered raw foods and their healing magic in 2011. She is passionate about healthy life hacks, and creating recipes that lead to greater health and healing. Follow her on Instagram @thegreatuncooking or Facebook.

    Try more of Natalie’s recipes on Omstars

     

  • Yogi Super Soup

    A meal that will keep you warm on those chilly spring days, boost your immunity with a hearty dose of super greens, and free up time in your beautiful life.

    This delicious soup is designed for those of us who enjoy healthy food, but don’t have a lot of time to spend in the kitchen. Enjoy a helping of this soup with a spoonful of sunflower seed butter for extra taste and nutrition.  Yoga teaches us to embrace the time we’re given, making this soup the perfect match for the dedicated yogi.

    Ingredients

    • 8 Cups Greens Mixture (Baby Kale, Chard, and Spinach)
    • ½ Sweet Onion – Diced
    • 2 Tomatoes – Diced
    • 1 Leek
    • 32-Oz. Vegetable Broth
    • 1 Tsp Minced Garlic
    • Salt to taste
    • Pepper to taste
    • 1 tsp Rosemary
    • 1 tsp Thyme

    Method

    • Process greens, onions, and tomatoes in food processor making them easier to digest.
    • Cut leek into coins.
    • Place soup pot on medium heat, adding in vegetable broth.
    • Add in all ingredients.
    • Bring soup to boil for 5-10 minutes, stirring regularly.
    • Reduce heat, and allow soup to simmer for approximately 30 minutes.
    • Allow soup 5 minutes to cool before consuming.
    • This recipe yields approximately 5-8 servings.

    Enjoy the comfort good food can bring. Namaste.

    By Jodi Lane

     

    Try More Vegan Recipes on Omstars

  • Chocolate and Raspberry Smoothie Bowl

    The smoothie bowl craze that’s been blending its way into society over the last few years ins’t over yet, and we are so excited to share this raw, plant-based treat with you. Did you know that the best time of day to eat chocolate is actually in the morning? And Lee Holmes is helping us capitalize on this delicious knowledge by sharing her recipe for a Chocolate and Raspberry Smoothie Bowl that will have your taste buds singing all morning long.

    This recipe makes 2 servings, but if you don’t have someone to share it with, don’t worry! You can actually make this smoothie in advance and freeze it in a muffin tray. When you’re ready to enjoy, take three out, whiz them in your high-speed blender and you’ll be good to go!

    Side note, wouldn’t this be the perfect treat to share with your someone special this valentines day? We think so!

    Ingredients:

    2 frozen bananas
    1 ripe avocado, peeled
    125 g (41/2 oz/1 cup) raspberries

    2 tablespoons raw cacao powder
    1 teaspoon vanilla powder

    130 g (41/2 oz/1/2 cup)r coconut yoghurt

    125 ml (4 fl oz/1/2 cup) almond milk or plant milk of your choice

    The method for putting this bowl together is simple. Blend together all of your ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy. The mixture should have a spoonable consistency.

    Then, pour the mixture into two bowls and decorate with your chosen topping(s).

    Choose your favorite toppings to put the finishing touches on your smoothie bowl, or use any of the following items recommended by Lee:
    edible flowers, passion fruit, lilly pilly berries, banana, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, almonds, pepitas (pumpkin seeds), chia seeds, coconut flakes, cacao nibs, granola and/or nut butter.

    Enjoy!

    Recipe by Lee Holmes

    Followe Lee on instagram @leesupercharged or check out her website superchargedfoods.com

    Lee Holmes, Gut Friendly Food Expert, Super charged foods, recipes, OMstars