• Layered Salted Caramel Peanut Fudge

     

    This is one of my favourite freezer desserts, and I like to keep it ready to grab at a moment’s notice. A decadent delight, it homes in on the irresistible flavour combo of caramel and sea salt. The unique peanutty edge makes it fulfilling for adults with a cuppa, but also brings plenty of happiness to little kids.

    Fudge

    • 270 g (9.5 oz/1 cup) almond butter
    • 80 ml (2.5 fl oz/ 1/3 cup) coconut oil, melted
    • 90 g (3.25 oz/ 1/4 cup) rice malt syrup
    • 30 g (1 oz/ 1/4cup) raw cacao powder
    • 1 teaspoon alcohol-free vanilla extract
    • 1/2 teaspoon Celtic sea salt

    Salted caramel and peanut

    • 90 g (3.25 oz/1/4 cup) rice malt syrup
    • 2 tablespoons cashew butter or other nut butter
    • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
    • sea salt, to taste
    • 35 g (1.25 oz/1/3 cup) roasted salted peanuts

    Method:

    Line a 12 × 18 cm (41/2× 7 inch) baking tin with baking paper.

    To make the fudge layer, whiz the almond butter and coconut oil in a food processor until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth and creamy. Spoon the mixture into the prepared tin to 3 cm (11/4 inches) deep and smooth the top with the back of a spoon or a spatula.

    For the salted caramel and peanut layer, clean the food processor then process all the ingredients except the peanuts until the mixture has a caramel-like consistency.

    Spoon the salted caramel over the fudge, smooth with the back of a spoon or a spatula, then scatter the peanuts over and press them in gently. Freeze for at least 1 hour before slicing and serving. If stored frozen for longer, it may need some time in the fridge to soften a little before serving.

    Sprinkle with extra salt before serving, if you like.

    By Lee Holmes

     

    Lee Holmes, Gut Friendly Food Expert, Super charged foods, recipes, OMstars

  • Vegan Banana Bread

    Have some overripe bananas you need to use? Time to make banana bread! And we’ve got a new vegan banana bread recipe just for you. Not only is banana bread delicious, but it’s a great way to satisfy that sweet tooth. Cut up and enjoy a slice for dessert after dinner, or try eating a piece of banana bread as breakfast for those on-the-go mornings. However you choose to serve up your banana bread, this spiced treat is sure to make you smile.

    Vegan Banana Bread

     

    – 2 cups 100% whole wheat flour
    – 1 tsp of baking powder
    – 1/2 tsp of baking soda
    – 1 tsp cinnamon
    – 1/2 tsp nutmeg
    – 1/4 tsp clove
    – 1/4 tsp of salt
    – 1 stick of vegan butter
    – 3/4 cup raw cane sugar
    – 1/4 cup vegan brown sugar
    – 1 tsp vanilla extract
    – 4 bananas

    Method

    Grease and flour one loaf pan.
    Preheat oven at 350.
    In a large bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, clove and salt.
    In a stand up mixer, cream together butter, sugar, vanilla extract, and brown sugar.
    While the mixer is creaming the ingredients, mash bananas in a separate bowl, just enough so there is still some texture but well mashed.
    Add mashed bananas in the mixer. The banana acts as a binder so no need to add any egg substitute like a chia egg for example.
    Turn mixer speed down to low and gradually add 1/2 cup dry ingredients into the stand up mixer.
    Mix until combined then add another 1/2 cup.
    Keep repeating the process until all of the dry ingredient mixture winds up in the stand up mixer.
    Finally, mix until all ingredients are nice and smooth.
    Pour batter into prepared loaf pan and bake for 1 hour and 20 mins or until toothpick comes out clean.
    Let cool for 10 mins before cutting.
    Enjoy with a nice cup of coffee or your favorite cup of tea.
    Vegan Banana bread recipe on OMstars

    by Karyn Homeriki

    Get to know a little more about Karyn Homeriki by visiting her page on instagram
  • An Interview with Erica Tenggara

    Who is Erica Tenggara? You may have seen her course on OMstars, or maybe you follow her on instagram, but we wanted to know more – about who she is as a teacher, about her relationship with yoga, and why yoga is so important to her. So we reached out to Erica with a few interview style questions, and now we’re sharing her answers with you! Check out Erica’s Interview below and find out if she’s someone you can relate to, someone you might like to practice with or someone who inspires you, then check out her course, A Week Of Practice, on OMstars.com!

    1. How long have you been practicing yoga and why did you start practicing yoga?

    I’ve been practicing for 5 years.

    I started practicing for a few reasons, the instigator was that I was bored. My boyfriend at the time spent most nights socializing & I was bored of that, so I decided to fill my nights with yoga.

    Why yoga? Because I couldn’t really do anything else. I tore my ACL in high school & couldn’t do anything high impact so yoga it was & yoga has been my main squeeze ever since.

    1. What is yoga to you?

    Yoga is my happy medium.

    I’m a very extreme, emotional, erratic/irrational person. I’m very up & down but in yoga, I’m at a medium, I am just okay & I’m okay with that. I can’t escape, it’s not an escape. Practicing is a time for me to find a way to be okay with the practice and myself & that has a ripple effect into my life off the mat. So in a way, yoga is my mediator.

    1. How did you feel after your first yoga class and how do you want students to feel after they practice with you?

    Like I was on a high. I started out with Bikram yoga, the teacher was Irish & spoke with this incredible motivating Irish accent. I loved it! It was so hard, so much sweat, so much holding of what seems easy but isn’t & left me feeling like “woah – I don’t know what it is but I friggin love this”

    For my students though, I’d love for them to walk a way from my practice with a better sense of understanding. I’m not so into needing to create a high. But if someone can understand either themselves, a pose, a process, a feeling a little more than they did before. I feel like I have done my job. Awareness & perspective I realize more & more each day is what makes living a little more manageable & that’s what I’d like to give to my students, a way for them feel like what yoga is for me – a happy medium. A mediator.

    1. What impact has yoga had on your life? Who were you before you started practicing and how have you changed, evolved and transformed?

    Such a huge question. Where do I begin!

    Long story short: I’m a third culture kid who has gone through 2 parent divorces. Both of those divorces made me feel abandoned. Even today they still do although I realize them leaving me has actually nothing to do with me (that’s the yoga there – the realization/awareness)

    For whatever connecting reasons, in school I was depressed, bulimic & attempted suicide I think in 2009.

    Today though – I love my life & I believe I have a future in this lifetime.

    I feel I am naturally, highly emotional. I’m very erratic and irrational which can be a great thing but not always. I take everything to heart & it’s hard for me to take a joke and criticism. So of course I am also hard on myself & I am hard on others. This has affected the relationships I’ve had with everyone I have known from family, friends, colleagues, boyfriends and even students etc.

    I cannot say it is the yoga practice itself but it’s the elements of yoga & the yoga community that has helped me become a more understanding, empathic person with both myself & others.

    I can’t say I’m made of sugar but I can say that if someone is in child pose, I no longer just think they’re lazy. When it comes to my family, especially to my Mum, maybe it’s just cause I’m finally growing up a little bit, but I am making an effort to be nicer to her. Even when she’s so annoying, I try to make peace with her & try not to control the decisions she wants to make for herself.

    When it comes to relationships and yes I mean romantic relationships, I try to make better decisions. I think someone like me who is so erratic, who has gone through parent divorces, bulimia, depression etc. You crave love. You crave love, attention, affection. You want to feel wanted & desired & that feeling when you have it is addicting. It’s a high.

    I’ve learned though, to have a little more self control, to be aware of those feelings of need & desire, try to step back and look at the bigger picture “is this what I want?”

    And so the relationship I am in now, is the most grown up relationship I have ever been in. It’s one where although there is still a lot (like loads) of love, there is an effort to not just rely on affection. But to be two responsible adults for not just ourselves, but each other. Basically, I don’t always win all the fights & I get called out for my s**t. Which rarely happens. Even with my friends & family.

    I’m kinda rambling but in summary I’m a better person to myself, I’m a better colleague, better friend, better lover & daughter than I was before yoga.

    1. Why did you decide to start teaching yoga and what makes a good yoga teacher?

    I didn’t really decide I want to teach yoga, it was more a “wow, this is what I am meant to do” kind of situation.

    It was when I was doing my mock teaching during YTT – which I took for just curiosity sake really, and that’s when I had the “aha” moment.

    What makes a good yoga teacher? This is based on personal preference.

    I have a few teachers that I consider mentors & I love them for different reasons so I’ll just describe them and I think then it’ll make sense.

    Patrick Creelman

    Patrick is a child in an adult body. But when he teaches he is all business. Mostly influenced by Iyengar & Anusara yoga so as expected he is also strict. The only time I have ever done a child pose outside of his sequencing was when I had altitude sickness.

    His instructions can get annoying, if you have been to an Iyengar class, they talk – non-stop. But I kinda love it, the instructions make me work hard, Patrick makes me work hard. He’s one of the few teachers I know who doesn’t give a crap that I am a teacher, that I’ve got Instagram, that I’m… whatever. But if I’m in class, he works me hard & works me to my fullest potential without forgetting the other 50 students in the room.

    Arun Rana

    Arun is more your guru type yoga teacher. He has that presence. When he walks into the classroom everyone stops talking & sits in preparation. He specializes in flexibility & is the inspiration behind many of my tutorials that I have shared both on OMstars & instagram.

    Arun is also a very empathetic & understanding teacher, his is the total opposite of Patrick but still he has the ability to make you work hard without telling you to work hard. He just has that presence where you want to work hard for him.

    His sequencing I would 100% say can make the stiffest person more flexible.

    Noelle Connolly

    Is an American teacher based in Sydney & she is a 40 year old beast. She is just bad ass. She is a no fuss take no bull kind of teacher yet her teachings come through with love & intention. She totally summaries the definition of tough love.

    Her sequencing is what inspires my flows. She somehow is able to combine methods of iyengar & ashtanga into a modern day flow to amazing music.

    So Patrick is I would say my alignment & technique teacher, Arun is my flexibility (both physically & emotionally) teacher & Noelle is my transition & movement teacher. Each all so different from the other but each great at teaching.

    Not everyone likes these teachers, no one can please everyone. But more often than not, it’s the teachers who make you realise your potential or who believe in your potential, whether through asana or just life in general, who make you come back for more.

    1. What style of yoga do you practice and what makes that style most effective? Do you have a teacher in your style of yoga?

    I practice mostly Hatha yoga that is iyengar inspired.

    I love alignment, I love simple effective sequencing that isn’t about being pretty, but about creating accessibility & thus freedom in the body & mind.

    Patrick Creelman is right now is my main influence in my teachings.

    1. What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out on their yoga journey?

    Dont worry, dont rush. Trust.

    1. What has been your biggest struggle and your biggest milestone in the practice?  

    The handstand.

    I have such a love & hate relationship with handstand. I don’t feel that anyone is better when they can hand balance but it seems to be what is most admired on Instagram these days. Maybe that’s why I don’t love it? And to be honest, I was very happy when I couldn’t handstand but now just because I know it’s so hard to get & I see it all the time on IG. It makes me want to do it more & I question – why. Like is this so necessary?

    So although it was such a high when I could finally handstand, it’s also caused me injuries & makes me question my ego more than I would like.

    1. What is the single most defining issue facing the global yoga community today?

    Instagram.

    It is so love and hate. Instagram for me in the beginning was a place where I could discover other local yogis & just kind of rejoice in our little community. But now? It’s about personalities, popularity etc. What you see on Instagram, with an exception to a few select accounts is not what yoga really is in a class setting.

    It’s so conflicting & I am conflicted as well. 95% of my photos on IG, I’m wearing make up & my hair is down.

    But in real life? I only really wear make up for date night & hair is mostly tied up.

    But everyone does that. So does it make it okay? Or am I just thinking too much? Let IG be IG, let real life be real life. Does this even matter?

    1. What’s the most embarrassing thing that has ever happened to you as a student and as a teacher?

    Queefing & sweaty back farts. In both teaching & student situations. But such is life.

    1. What is your dharma, your life mission? 

    I don’t really have a life mission to be honest and many may not know but as much as I love teaching yoga, I actually just really want to be a mother and eventually have being a mother as my main job & teaching on the side. Can that be considered a dharma? A life mission? 😅

    Erica Tenggara

  • Coriander Pesto

    You may know coriander as cilantro. Either way, it’s detoxifying effects are legendary and enhanced when you combine it with chlorella (more on that another time). Coriander helps chelate toxins from the body, this means it binds to the waste products to help remove them from the cells.

    Today it’s the recipe I want to share with you. Forget the science.  Just know that when you eat this you’ll be doing great things for your body.  

    Ingredients

    I large bunch of coriander

    1 cup raw macadamia nuts

    1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

    1 lime juiced (about 1/4 of cup)

    1 large clove garlic

    1 tsp malden sea salt

    2 – 4 tbs of home made coconut yoghurt (see below for link)

    1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes or freshly chopped chilli to taste

    Method

    I blended up a massive bunch of coriander with a cup of macadamia nuts, 1/4 cup olive oil, lime juice, garlic, chilli,  sea salt and 2 tbs coconut yoghurt. My homemade coconut yoghurt was already sweetened so it was a nice way to offset the chilli.Creamy, delicious and  healing. Just what you should expect from #wholefoods #rawfoods. 

    This would be a fabulous dressing drizzled over salad and rolled into a wrap. But right now I’m just eating it by the spoonful. If you haven’t yet made your own yoghurt then I encourage you to grab the next opportunity for a full moon and make it.

    By Natalie Prigoone

    Check out Natalie’s course The Great Uncooking Real Food/Raw Food, on Omstars wellness channel for more scrumptious recipes!

    Coconut Yoghurt

    Add your delicious coriander pesto to wrap!

    Colourful vegan wraps

     

  • Yoga For All

    The practice of yoga means a great many things to a great many people. For some, yoga is just an exercise. For others, yoga is a path to greater spiritual understanding. For me, yoga means a practice of connection and liberation. A connection to myself through breath and movement and a larger connection to the world through consciousness-raising and activism. Yoga has taught me to see wholeness in both the external part of who I am and an internal part of who I want to be.

    A

    ccording to ancient yoga philosophy, Hatha yoga can be a complete journey to wholeness. We can develop a connection to physical well-being through asana (physical practice)  and pranayama (breath work), mental clarity through concentration, meditation and spiritual illumination.

    For a lot of us, the images of yoga have primarily focused on the body beautiful; yoga as a function of beauty and physical prowess instead of an act of spiritual awakening. But do only young, thin, hypermobile or super flexible bodies do yoga?  What about everyone else who are invited to be on the yoga mat? Although you may not always see it, everyone can do yoga. Yoga is for everyone. While not all of us practice in the same way or have the same access to the practice, at the core of this practice is simply a connection to our breath and each other. We all can do that regardless of our abilities, the size of our bodies or our socioeconomic backgrounds.

    Being able to do challenging or complicated poses is not what the practice of yoga is all about. It is about setting your soul free, making a connection to yourself and the world around you. Yoga can be a pause in your day to smell the flowers or take a walk in the park. Yoga can be a moment of quiet, compassionate self-reflection. Yoga can be a meal with friends or intense physical asana practice that gets you out of your head and feeling your body. Yoga can be stillness and quiet. Yoga can be anything that connects you to a deeper understanding of yourself and a feeling of connection to the world.

    Don’t let the images you see of yoga scare you. Know that this is only one way to see yoga, through a lens that values ability over spirituality and unity. Yoga happens everywhere.  Yes, you can do yoga. Find a class or teacher that understands what you want and need from your practice and jump in. You won’t regret it.

    By Dianne Bondy

    Click here to learn more about Dianne

    Omstars will be launching a course with Dianne in early 2018, in the meantime watch this space for more posts by her leading up to the release!

    Follow Dianne on Instagram